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Mayford Tempranillo 2012
Tempranillo is an early ripener which tends to develop fuller flavours and aromatics when grown to the cooler climes of Victoria's Ovens Valley
$3499each
$419DOZEN
Mayford Vineyard Was Established Within A Mildly Temperate Amphitheatre With a view to crafting limited yields of hand made wine Tempranillo was a natural fit with its late bud burst and early maturity, planted on a bony ridge which restricts berries to pea size, keeping the vines inherent vigor in check. A flagship boutique effort, treated to an old world vinification, achieving an evocatively new world styling.
Escarpment is a joint venture by Heathcote Estate/ Yabby Lake's dynamic duo
Escarpment Pinot Noir Martinborough
$4499each
$539DOZEN
THE MESSRS KIRBY AND MCKENNA. No expense was spared. the pick of Pinot Noir rootstock and clones were established to precious alluvial gravel terraces at the base of Aorangi Ranges. Inspired by the classics of Burgundy. Escarpment expresses the distinctive character of Martinborough's unique terroir. Engaging perfumes. elegant flavours and soft ripe tannins are all hallmarks of the finest Martinborough Pinot Noir. .
 
Katnook Estate Odyssey Cabernet Sauvignon
Outstanding Langtons Classification
$8599each
$1031DOZEN
John Riddoch Founded The Historic Coonawarra Fruit Colony At Katnook In 1890 Odyssey was first released in 1996 to celebrate the centenary of Katnook's first vintage under an ancient Coonawarra woolshed Much of Odyssey's fruit can be traced back to the original sites established by Riddoch over a century ago. The brilliance of its appearance in the glass, identifies the splendour of Odyssey, an abundance of fruit, luxury oak and substantive palate, make it a wine of the highest peerage.
$4999each
$599DOZEN
Brezza Barbera dAlba Cannubi BARBERA ARE MADE FROM LOW YIELD FRUIT, treated to long macerations and ageing in large oak barrels. In Australia the name Brezza has become synonymous with the Barbera from Piedmont. The Barbera d'Alba Cannubi is a taste of the hospitality shown by the Brezza family in their Hotel Barolo, and the robust, authentic wines Enzo Brezza produces in his winery below the hotel. Cannubi is one of the most famous Barolo vineyards, and Brezza have resisted the temptation to replant this precious plot of Barbera with more lucrative varietals.
$2399each
$287DOZEN
Yarra Burn Limited Release Pyrenees Shiraz 2003 3 TROPHYS FOR THE BEST SHIRAZ, Best Red & Best Wine of Show Le Concours des Vins, and 4 Golds to date. This is the first time that Yarra Burn Shiraz has been entirely from the Pyrenees region, reflecting the magnificent red vintage in the region. 2003 was warm and dry but also very low-yielding, resulting in fruit with fantastic concentration of flavour. An honest, western districts Shiraz with warm Rhône-like qualities, offering earthy flavours of blackberry and plums, thoroughly distinguished, impeccably fine and tight.
$1399each
$167DOZEN
Rosemount Diamond Label Chardonnay DIAMOND LABEL HAS REMAINED A STAPLE AROUND RESTAURANT TABLES THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA FOR DECADES. Everyone can appreciate it's consistency of quality, seamless palate, lively fruit and easy to enjoy styling. The bottle's diamond shaped footprint is a reflection of Rosemount's distinctive label, which has served as a beacon to lovers of good wine. A Chardonnay which can lay claim to being the most popular offering within it's range each and every year, it remains the first choice for today's relaxed lifestyle, refreshing, universally appealing and completely satisfying.
$1999each
$239DOZEN
Odd One Out Cabernets 2008 A RICH ASSEMBLAGE OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON, Merlot and Cabernet Frank from Yin Barun Vineyard, Merlot from the Gralaine property near Geelong and Petit Verdot from Colbinabbin Estate at Heathcote. Hanging Rock Wines know about the noble French varietals, the estate patriarch has received French Australian Chamber of Commerce Flair Award for fostering French Australian relations. Hanging Rock's young French team have treated this complex cepage of fruit to a highly stylized vinification that's aimed at the modern Australian palate.
Johann Gottlob Schrapel
and his family arrived in South Australia from Silesia on the ship George Washington in 1844, just eight years after the colony was settled
Like many of their fellow Germanic migrants they made their way by ox cart to Bethany, the Barossa Valley’s first settlement, where they established a home and cleared the land to grow crops and graze animals. The Schrapels planted their first vineyard in 1852 from cuttings carefully nursed from Europe. A wine cellar was also built, but despite Johann’s reputation as an early colonial winemaker, the family concentrated on grape growing rather than winemaking for the next four generations. More than a century later in 1981, Johann’s fifth generation descendants, brothers Geoff and Robert Schrapel, established Bethany Wines in a quarry, where the pioneers had hewn stone for their homes, high in the Barossa Ranges overlooking the family’s vineyards and the historic village of Bethany.
 Bethany

The early 1980s were tough times for Barossa grapegrowers. A red wine boom was followed by a glut and, as grape prices fell below production cost, the State Government encouraged growers to pull out their old Shiraz and Grenache vines. Instead, the Schrapels chose to establish a tradition of winemaking from this undervalued yet irreplaceable resource of old vineyards. Gradually their reputation grew.

Now a vibrant family wine company, Bethany Wines employs many people and plays a significant role in the Barossa community. Geoff and Robert’s vision was to create a Barossa wine experience and in doing so, improve the quality of life for their customers, friends and family. In this they have succeeded. Their aim is to live well, provide for their children, care for the land and hand the winery and vineyards to the next generation in a better position than when they started.

The family's historic vineyards are the key to production of theiquality wines. Thirty hectares of vineyard in Bethany are owned by the Schrapels, comprising the Bethanien Block, the Old Manse Block and the Homestead Block. A range of varieties are grown from Chardonnay, Riesling and Semillon to Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Grenache. The age of their vines ranges from 15 to 80 years. The old vines require traditional management of hand pruning and harvesting, while the newer plantings are managed with modern viticultural techniques such as close planting, high trellises and canopy control.

Geoff and Robert look for maximum expression of fruit flavour in their wines and pay particular attention to the careful handling of grapes at vintage. The use of chemicals is minimised in grape growing and wine is made in small lots to maximise variations in fruit flavour and ripeness which contribute complexity to the wines; wines which are the most natural expression of their unique Barossa terroir.

During the last two decades Bethany Wines has won acclaim at Australian and international wine shows and consumer tastings for its hand-made, fruit driven wines. The greatest natural advantage the Schrapels have is the fruit which comes from the family's carefully tended vineyards. Their thirty hectares of vineyard in Bethany, comprising the Bethanien Block, the Old Manse block and the Homestead Block are fanned during summer evenings with cooling gully breezes, creating a special microclimate which allows the grapes to achieve good sugar and acid levels without becoming over-ripe. It takes a long time to know a vineyard. At Bethany these vines can live for four or five generations. The special understanding of how to grow grapes on the unique Bethany clay soils has taken many years for the Schrapel descendants to master.

Traditional vignerons, Marc
Scalzo and Lisa Hernan established a homestead vineyard by planting their own Chardonnay and Shiraz vines on a picturesque site in Beechworth
Piano Piano vineyards are located on a highly sought after golden mile amongst some of Beechworth’s most notable wine producers. They focus on making premium, estate grown single vineyard wines, vintages with a strong sense of place. Rather than impose his own personality on the wines, Marc has always strived to let the vineyard tell its own story. Marc started his wine education around the kitchen table at home. His father Mario introduced him to a wide selection of local and Italian wines. After graduating with a Science degree from Monash University and working for IBM for five years, the lure of wine was strong. Marc then studied Wine Science at Charles Sturt University and has many years of practical experience, including seven years as a winemaker at Brown Brothers and vintages at Giaconda, Seresin Estate (NZ), Delegat’s (NZ) and John Gehrig Wines. Marc is also Chief Winemaker at Rutherglen Estates.
 Piano Piano

In 1997 Marc planted his first vines with Geoff Simpson at Brangie vineyard in King Valley. Oliver’s Blend, named after their eldest son and Mario’s Blend, named after Marc’s father are from the Brangie Vineyard. After searching for seven years Marc and his wife Lisa purchased their property at Beechworth in 2003. The Beechworth hills are famous for granitic soils and fine cool climate wines. They have since planted Chardonnay in 2006 and Shiraz in 2008. Sophie’s Block Chardonnay was named after their daughter Sophie who was born the year the Chardonnay was planted and similarly Henry’s Block Shiraz was planted, the year their youngest son Henry was born.

The famous Beechworth region is known for its iconic wines. Much of this can be attributed to the altitude, granitic soil and climate. Piano Piano vineyard is located on Beechworth-Wangaratta Road, at an altitude of 400m. The Chardonnay is planted on the southeast facing slope, in deep decomposed granitic top soil over rich clay. Sophie’s Block is situated on the coolest part of the site.

This cooler mesoclimate enhances the delicate but powerful flavours in the grapes. Given its proximity to some of Beechworth’s finest vineyards, the Chardonnay is already showing the exciting potential of this site. Five different clones, including the Bernard clones have been close planted at 1.2m x 2.4m rows to maximise intensity and complexity.

Piano Piano Shiraz was planted on the northeast facing slope in decomposed granite soils, characterised by white granitic pebbles on the surface of a decomposed granite loam mix. At a depth of one meter the underlying clay is critical to the water holding capacity of the block whilst the granitic soils supply that rare, ethereal quality that makes Henry’s Block Shiraz so special. To enhance the cool climate quality of the fruit, vine rows have been planted in an east west orientation. Four Shiraz clones were selected to add complexity and spice and the vines were also planted at 1.2m x 2.4m. Piano Pianos Beechworth vines complement the King Valley plantings, established in partnership with Geoff Simpson, in the late 1990s.

This property is situated on the banks of the Hurdle Creek in the lower King valley, on a site perfectly situated for growing red wine grapes. The soil profile of sandy loam sitting on a clay base is ideal for controlling vigor. This ensures the grapes are grown under slight stress, thereby decreasing yields and maximising flavour and colour intensity.

Situated just 5
kilometres east of Martinborough village, Escarpment's 24 hectares of distinctive alluvial gravel, terraced land stretches out along the banks of the Huangarua River
Overlooking the vineyard are the Aorangi Ranges, the very hills made famous by Kupe the great Polynesian voyager who discovered New Zealand, according to Maori legend. Kupe left his three canoes, Nga Waka, on top of the range, giving rise to the now familiar landmark of the district, the three flat-topped hills on top of the range, which resemble unturned canoes. This warrior and his story provide the inspiration for the vineyard's distinctive brand and logo
 Escarpment

Escarpment's aim is simple, to continually produce the very best of tomorrow's definitive New World wines. Complexity, texture and structure are key words and motivators. Under Larry McKenna's leadership the team aims to reward wine lovers with progressive and suggestive wines that encourage them to venture to the edge of wine loving and appreciation. Escarpment Vineyard was established in 1999 as a joint business venture between Robert & Mem Kirby (of Australia's Village Roadshow) and Larry & Sue McKenna. Collectively, these four directors bring to Escarpment a world of experience, skill and understanding to the nurturing and making of fine, deliciously sublime wine.

It goes without saying the impetus behind establishing this vineyard came from the four's deep love for Pinot Noir. Meeting by chance in 1999 through Dr Richard Smith, Larry and Robert quickly hit it off and realised they had more than a love for the grape in common. Serious talk about establishing a definitive New World vineyard began in earnest even then and the idea whose time has come has resulted in one of the most significant vineyard developments in the New Zealand district of Martinborough.

Making the decision to establish their own vineyard was one thing, finding that special piece of land that offered the essential ingredients required for optimal grape growing and wine making was another. Although they considered other wine growing areas in New Zealand, Larry and Sue kept coming back to the Martinborough area. They knew the area intimately having grown grapes there and making wine there for years. They were convinced Martinbrough offered the rich mix of elements they required to grow and make fine New World wine, particularly their pinots.

They soon discovered the Te Muna river terraces across the other side of the hill and knew this was it for them! Basically being an extension of Martinborough's famed terrace land, the Te Muna site offered all the right attributes, with land a-plenty for their purposes. Larry and Sue firmly believe the Te Muna valley is the new future of Martinborough. Evidence for this is seen in the range of new vineyards being established in the area, including much talked about Craggy Range, whose planting alone will double the current output of Martinborough.

A special place and name Te Muna, means secret or special place, and that is exactly how the people at Escarpment feel about the land and what it means to live, grow and make wine there. Deciding the vineyard's name took far more soul searching with ideas bandied about for weeks on end, creating confusion rather than clarity! It wasn't until Robert's brother in law, David Glass, went out walking along the eastern boundary of the property one dusky evening that the inspiration came to him in a flash

Bidgeebong's wines come
from the south-west slopes of NSW, an area emerging as the source for some of Australia's most interesting and exciting premium and super-premium wines
The Bidgeebong Triangle encompasses three distinct districts, Tumbarumba in the foothills of the Snowy Mountains, the Hilltops district centred on the town of Young, and the Murrumbidgee plain around Gundagai on the Hume Highway about half way between Sydney and Melbourne. The name Bidgeebong is a combination of Murrumbidgee and Billabong. The Murrumbidgee River is the lifeline of the region. Billabongs meaning places of still water in the Wiradjuri language, were the gathering or meeting places of the original owners of the area, the Wiradjuri tribe. The Wiradjuri occupied this land from time immemorial until Irish farmers established and named the first stations here in the 1800s.
 Bidgeebong

The three winegrowing regions provide Bidgeebong's chief winemaker, Andrew Birks, with a range of options that ensure consistency of both style and quality in wines released under the various Bidgeebong labels. Each year, Birks has available to him grapes grown in the cool-to-cold alpine climate of Tumbarumba, the mild-to-cool climate of Hilltops/Young and in the mild-to-warm Gundagai climate. These allow him to produce outstanding single-district wines, such as Tumbarumba Chardonnay and Gundagai Shiraz, and also the high-quality blended wines released under the Bidgeebong Triangle label.

The flexibility and diversity of wine grape production within the three wine regions supplying the Bidgeebong Winery is one of the major commercial advantages of the operation. This wine grape producing area is set to become a recognised supplier of premium quality wines on a par with the best in Australia, as planting expands and quality improves. The Gundagai, Hilltops (Young) and Tumbarumba wine regions, in the southern New South Wales foothills of Australia's highest mountain, Mt Kosciuszko, are all located within two hours road transport to Bidgeebong Winery.

These regions have seen a dramatic increase in new plantings of wine grape varieties in the last five years

This expansion of vineyards in the region is reflecting recent New South Wales wine industry trends of continued development of new small and medium sized wineries with increased specialisation in specific varieties, regional styles and brands based on cool-to-medium climate Shiraz, Pinot Noir, Merlot and Mediterranean varietals. Nowhere in Australia, perhaps even the world, can match the grape growing - and hence the winemaking - flexibility of the 'Bidgeebong Triangle'.

Grapes grown in Tumbarumba, with an alpine climate marginal for grapes even in warm years, are part of the available mix, along with fruit from cool, elevated Young (Hilltops) and relatively low-lying Gundagai, with its consequently milder and warmer climate. Yet these three areas and their vineyards are all within easy reach of Wagga Wagga, the regional centre and Australia's largest inland town, where the Bidgeebong Winery is located.

Bidgeebong's first two vintages - 2000 and 2001 - were handled at Charles Sturt University. Just prior to the 2002 vintage, an existing facility on the outskirts of Wagga Wagga was purchased and converted into a modern winery. Chief winemaker Andrew Birks regards it as providing the ideal environment for making ultra-premium wine: "It's absolutely hygeinic, it's been filled with state-of-the art equipment, and it's close to transport, power, labour and, most importantly, our grape sources."

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services