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Bleasdale Adelaide Hills Chardonnay
Adelaide Hills are but an hour's drive from Bleasdale but the style of Chardonnay grown to the cool ripening aspects of elevated
$1899each
$227DOZEN
Undulating Hillsides Is A World Away From That Grown To The Bleasdale Property At Langhorne Creek The Adelaide Hills style is distinctly crisper and more aromatic one could say it even tastes chilled at room temperature. An extravagant course of barrel ferments, wild yeast vinification and lees exposure makes a richly textured Chardonnay wine with good colour, savoury vanillan aromatics and solid palate structure.
 
Jacobs Creek Sparkling Rose N.V
The classic blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir exhibits sharpness and warmth in equal measures
$1199each
$143DOZEN
A Superb Bouquet And Palate Which Mixes Citrus Fruit And Lingering Red Berry Flavours Like most editions of Jacob's Creek it's accessible, very easy to drink and always satisfying. Complexity and consistency of style is achieved by assembling a coterie of vintage and reserve wines, bottle fermented to traditional methods.
 
Wynns Glengyle Cabernet Sauvignon
Established by John Riddoch in 1891
$5999each
$719DOZEN
Wynns Now Retain Some Marvelous Old Vineyards With each harvest Wynns select a single distinguished site to bottle as a superior vintage release. Glengyle was planted in 1969 and is traditionally one of the first Coonawarra vineyards to ripen. Matured eighteen months in a selection of French oak barriques and hogsheads, beautifully evolved after years of bottle age under the Wynn estate cellars, Glengyle's silky tannins, precision and length, support a concentrated palate of animate black currants flavours, black cherry and cassis.
$1699each
$203DOZEN
Hardys No Preservatives Chardonnay FRUIT FROM HEALTHY VINEYARDS SPECIALIZED IN YIELDING GRAPES TO SPECIFICATION, early ripening and disease free, is selected to make the Hardy No-additives range of wines. Barrel fermentation introduces subtle oak complexity onto the palate, whilst maintaining a reductive environment (non-oxidising) for the wine through contact with sedimentery yeast lees (for heightened flavour profiles). Utilizing innovative preservatives-free vinification, Hardy have been able to craft a wine without the use of any additives, purely for the enjoyment of good Chardonnay.
$2399each
$287DOZEN
St Huberts Chardonnay ONE OF THE YARRA VALLEY'S ORIGINAL VINEYARDS DATING BACK TO 1862, St Huberts currently operates four blocks of distinguished Chardonnay vines. Planted on a gentle slope of well drained grey loamy soils, the fruit from these parcels provides the backbone to one of Victoria's most stately Chardonnay wines. The princely berries translate into a beautifully aromatic bouquet and rich palate, slightly citrus, set against a background of grapefruit, apple and melon flavours all bound together by suggestions of cool climate mineral and French vanilla oak.
$3599each
$431DOZEN
Balgownie Estate Shiraz SHIRAZ VINES WERE ESTABLISHED AT BALGOWNIE ESTATE IN 1969, followed by a second planting in 1974. The carefully selected site near Bendigo has provided excellent conditions throughout four decades, producing impressive reds since the inaugural vintage of 1972. Balgownie is most notable for its deep red colour, vibrant berry fruit aromas, subtle use of oak, velvety textures and fine, lingering tannins. A splendid match to crackling encrusted, succulently roast joint of juicy young pork.
High on a
hill overlooking the beautiful Hunter Valley.
A state-of-the-art winery. An imposing bell tower. Spacious tasting rooms. Magnificent cellars. Bimbadgen Estate. Dedicated to the art of wine. Bimbadgen Estate Winery is situated two hour's drive north-west of Sydney in the picturesque Hunter Valley, Australia's oldest premium wine producing region.
 Bimbadgen Estate

The winery itself is a reflection of the commitment to quality Hunter Valley wines renowned around the world. No expense has been spared in acquiring state-of-the-art wine-making technology combined with the finest grapes and the best French and American barrels that produce very special regional wines.

Built in a distinctive Australian/ Mediterranean style, Bimbadgen, which means 'lovely views', is truly a world class endeavour.

Unique Soil Structures. Strong established vines. Grapes of magnificent intensity and flavour. Hallmarks of the best Hunter Valley vineyards.

The Hunter Valley region has long been regarded as a premium wine-producing area; renowned in particular for its classic bottle-aged Semillon, full-flavoured Chardonnay and intense Shiraz styles.

The Hunter Valley's soils are naturally suited to the growing of high quality grapes; grapes which are characteristically full of flavour, depth and intensity.

Richard and Pam
Austin began their journey with wine 27 years ago with a five-acre vineyard, in Geelong, dedicated to making super premium wines for Australia’s best restaurants
The Austins planted their first vines in the Barrabool Hills, southwest of Geelong, in the early 1980s. The soil they turned was the same worked by the pioneering Swiss more than a century before. During it's nineteenth century heyday, the Geelong region was recognised as producing some of the finest red wines made in Australia's first one hundred years. This was at a time when the Victorian wine industry out-produced the sum of the South Australian and New South wales industries by a factor of two. The area suffered badly in the second half of the nineteenth century when phylloxera (a grapevine pest) and bureaucracy combined to destroy the region. The Moorabool Valley re-emerged in the first days of the Victorian wine industry's renaissance, in the 1960s. Recognition of that link has played a major part in the Austin family's affair with wine and the move to Sutherlands Creek.
 Austins

In the 1990s, the family purchased a large property near Bannockburn, in the Geelong region. Richard Austin set about planting of 150 acres of vines with the single-minded focus of producing the best value Pinot Noir in the world. One of the great challenges in modern winemaking is to consistently produce Burgundian-style Pinot Noir at an affordable price. The success of that determination, in achieving a pinot noir for the people, comes down to the acumen and persistence of the Austins family, an expertise well-honed in the corporate world and a love and understanding of the wine and food. Richard Austin propagated the business plan and planted the vines. Pam Austin drove sales and, more recently, their son Scott Austin assumed control of the company and took Austins to the rest of the world.

The climate, the rolling slopes of this part of the Moorabool Valley and the soil combine in a terroir that supports the vines with first-class fruit the result. Terroir is all important. The world's best wines are made from the world's best vineyards. The pinot noir produced by Austins argues consistency of style and quality. The fruit and, thereby, the wine has a distinct point of difference with its peers. That difference impacts your senses - you can smell it and taste it.

The premium quality, of the pinot noir, is augmented by the mix of six clones throughout the vineyard. Austins vineyard, at Sutherlands Creek, includes one of the largest, family-owned holdings of Pinot Noir in Australia. The property also has small plantings of riesling, chardonnay, pinot gris, viognier and shiraz, all of which produce exceptional fruit in the cool climate conditions of the Moorabool Valley, a sub-region of Geelong.

Austins is situated in the heart of the Moorabool Valley, a sub-region of Geelong. Though one of Australia’s most recently recognised sub-regions, the Moorabool Valley can trace its wine industry roots back to the early 1840s, when Swiss immigrants began planting vines. These were some of the earliest plantings in Victoria.

Today, the Moorabool Valley produces high quality fruit for both white and red wine. In terms of style, these wines sit between those from the Yarra Valley and the Mornington Peninsula. It is a region of great promise and one that can harness the generosity of the Australian circumstance and offer wines of grace and finesse. Bounded by the vineyard at Sutherlands Creek and based on the history of the Geelong region, that core is shaped by the terroir of the site and given momentum by the perception and acumen of the Austin family. The blend of these elements transforms premium grapes into wines of finesse. Great pinot noir is perfection. For those who enjoy making it and those who want to pour another glass, pinot noir is the ultimate example of less is more, in the world of red wine. This growing band of supporters sees a wine that offers extraordinary detail and complexity within a fine and restrained package; while the impact on the senses can be immense, the touch is light.

Planted by Dr
Tom Cullity in 1967, Vasse Felix was the first vineyard and winery to be established in the Margaret River region
Situated in the sub-region of Willyabrup, Vasse Felix is now owned and operated by the Holmes a Court family. Visitors to the winery are welcomed by a unique underground cellar, a spectacular restaurant overlooking the original 1967 plantings and an exquisite art gallery, making Vasse Felix one of the great drawcards of the region. Margaret River enjoys perfect conditions for viticulture. It's Mediterranean climate features mild, wet winters and warm, dry summers - ideal for the growth of high quality fruit. By comparison with Bordeaux, Margaret River enjoys less rain during a longer, drier moderate growing and ripening period. In 1965 Dr John S Gladstones emphasised the region's suitability on his report "The Climate and Soils of Southern WA in relation to Vine Growing". Two years later Dr Tom Cullity planted his Vasse Felix vines.
 Vasse Felix

The name Vasse Felix was inspired by an early event in the district. Thomas Vasse was a French seaman who disappeared after his longboat overturned near the site of Busselton whilst exploring the treacherous coastline of Western Australia. (An expedition of Captain Hamelin’s Naturaliste and Captain Baudin’s Geographe) Felix was Hamelin’s middle name, and ironically, is the Latin word for lucky.

The Vasse Felix logo is a peregrine falcon. When Dr Tom Cullity’s first vines began to bear fruit, native birds or ‘silvereyes’ as they are commonly known, had a keen appetite for the sweet berries, so Dr Cullity trained a falcon to deter the pests. Although much time and effort went into this exercise, upon the falcon’s first free flight it soared into the sky and was never seen again. The Vasse Felix logo endures to this day.

The estate's low yielding, dry grown vines are planted on some of the world’s oldest soils. The sites enjoy long, warm growing seasons and cooling summer breezes from the nearby Indian and Southern Oceans. This moderating effect is responsible for creating wines of exceptional concentration and intensity whilst retaining elegance and finesse – these cooling summer breezes from two oceans are unique to the southwest corner of Western Australia.

The vineyards are mostly sited on gravel loam and loam soils. Principal red varieties planted are Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz and Merlot while Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc comprise the white varieties. Parcels of ultra premium fruit are fermented separately in small, static fermenters to retain the unique character of individual vineyards sites before being basket pressed and sent to the finest of French oak barriques.

The continuing worldwide demand for premium wines created the need for a new state-of-the-art winery at Vasse Felix. To meet the demands, the philosophy has always been that wines should be unique, distinctive and expressive of their surroundings. Though production levels have increased, the completion of the new Barrel Hall has provided the winemaking team with further control to maintain the quality of the wines. An impressive expanse, the Barrel Hall holds up to 5000 barriques in conditions that ensure efficient barrel fermentation and a controlled environment. Making use of the best equipment available, utilising the best production processes and an unwavering attitude to quality control, has made Vasse Felix winery one of the best in Western Australia.

Siituated in the
hills north of the McLaren Vale township in an area known as the Seaview sub region, the Coriole winemaking operation was aquired and re-established by the Lloyd Family during the sixties
Coriole's old house and barn were constructed in about 1860. The slate roof of the old house, and its immense slate slab floors are typical of early houses of the district. Coriole was first owned by an English company, managed by Geoffrey Kay, a distant relative of the the Kays of nearby Amery Winery. Coriole's old shiraz vines were planted in 1919, when the district was experiencing a strong surge in export growth of its burgundy style wines to England and increasing wine sales interstate.
 Coriole

The paths of Coriole and Seaview crossed in 1935, when the Kays bought Hope Farm. The Mannings had sold Hope Farm to the Cravens in 1891, and during World War I, the Craven's son was killed in action. In his grief, his father lost his mind, and the property was managed by his wife until 1935. In that year, she sold it to the Kays of Coriole, who ran both properties until 1948, when they sold to Edward Chaffey, and it became known as Seaview. In 1962, Coriole was sold to John Snell,who was of Swiss descent. Snell established Australia's first organic winery, Chateau Ban Sante. He farmed the original shiraz vines without chemical inputs, and built a small winery, which remains the nucleus of Coriole's modern winery today.

Hugh and Molly Lloyd acquired the property in 1968 and the first vintage release under the Coriole label was 1970. Hugh Lloyd (1914 - 1994) was a general practitioner in Adelaide's southern suburbs. The son of a Methodist minister, he had been raised in a teetotal Adelaide family, but had become very interested in wine in the 1950s. Molly Lloyd (nee Parsons 1914 - 1994) also had an enthusiasm for farming, as a member of the Parsons family who grew almonds and grapes and other fruit on the rich horticultural lands along the Sturt River in what is now suburban Oaklands Park in Adelaide.

Together, Hugh and Molly laid strong foundations for Coriole. Hugh Lloyd embarked on a development plan for the winery and vineyard, using the old shiraz vines to establish the reputation of the business, while equipping the winery with more modern technology. He was helped in the early years by winemaker Graeme Stevens, with Coriole winning the coveted Wine Bushing King and Queen title in both 1974 and 1975 for making the best shiraz wines in the McLaren Vale district.

The 1980's were a relative quite time in the Australian wine industry. It was during this period that Coriole pioneered the development of Italian varieties by planting Sangiovese, which became the only Sangiovese produced in the country for many years. Also during this period Coriole was one of the first companies to release an extra virgin olive oil and start producing aged sweet vinegar - released each year after five years maturation.

As the 1990s developed, interest in wine boomed. This was reinforced by the increasing evidence of the health benefits of red wine. During the 1990's the winery expanded its markets both in Australia and overseas. Winemakers at Coriole have included Robert Paul, Stephen Hall and since 1999 Grant Harrison. Paul Lloyd,the youngest sibling of the Lloyd family, became business manager in 1993. Today, Coriole employs eleven full time staff, and crushes more than 500 tonnes a year.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services