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Katnook Estate Prodigy Shiraz 2012
Excellent Langtons Classification
$8599each
$1031DOZEN
The Legend Continues For The Stately Katnook Of Coonawarra Prodigy is a limousine standard Coonawarra Shiraz which entered the market with a bang taking out the 1998 Jimmy Watson Trophy for its inaugural vintage, a remarkable feat, considering the fruit was sourced from completely new vines. The radiant regional characters are punctuated by an alluring combination of piquant pepper, fragrant bramble berries and anise, tightly wound into a wine of great depth, statuesque palate structure and remarkable grace.
 
Dugat Py Gevrey Chambertin 1er Cru Champeaux 2008
An uncompromising pursuit of excellence is central to the success of Domaine Dugat-Py
$41499each
$4979DOZEN
Viticulture Is Indispensably Holistic And Completely Organic The soil is sacred and the culture of the vine is deeply spiritual M Dugat adheres to principles of winemaking which have remained unchanged by his family for centuries. Very near the centre of Gevrey, in the older part of town, the cellars of an Abbaye built a millennia ago, are enlisted by Dugat-Py to age vintages of Champeaux Premier Cru in an extravagant selection of the finest new oak barriques.
From South Australia's
McLaren Vale
$2599each
$311DOZEN
Pirramimma White Label Shiraz
A densely coloured wine, deep red, almost black. Aromas of black plum, spices and brambleberry, infused with pepper and mocha. The intense palate delivers spiced blackberry, licorice and loganberries, seasoned by cracked peppercorn and hints of cedar. A rich, powerful Shiraz, balanced by firm meaty tannins and well integrated toasted oak, finishing with exceptional length.
$22999each
$2759DOZEN
Mount Pleasant Maurice OShea Shiraz 2014 MAURICE O'SHEA SHIRAZ IS MADE FROM VINES OVER A HUNDRED AND TWENTY YEARS OF AGE, planted by the estate's original proprietor, Charles King. A smaller portion is sourced from eighty years old rootstock on the adjoining Old Paddock Vineyard, planted by legendary winemaker Maurice O'Shea, who recognised the special characteristics and longevity of Hunter Valley wines. One of the nation's great wines, Maurice O'Shea once outscored Penfolds Grange and Henschke Hill of Grace to be the highest rating Shiraz in the Halliday Wine Companion.
$2099each
$251DOZEN
Brothers In Arms No6 Shiraz NUMBER 6 IS A REFERENCE TO THE SIXTH GENERATION OF ADAMS FAMILY TO GROW WINE GRAPES ON THE HISTORIC METALA PROPERTY AT LANGHORNE CREEK. Arthur Formby planted twenty one rows of Shiraz here in 1891 and a further 5½ acres in 1894, much of which is still producing outstanding quality fruit. The wines of Metala are legendary and represent many of Langhorne Creek's most memorable vintages. An intense but balanced Shiraz wine of delicious, gently spiced plum flavours and regional eucalypt minty notes, supported by fine, velvet tannins.
$1899each
$227DOZEN
Dal Zotto Pucino Prosecco IF EVER THERE WAS A WINE TO COUNTER THE CONVENTIONAL WISDOM, it must be Dal Zotto Estate Prosecco, the fun and fizzy Italian sparkling wine from the King Valley. Throw out those notions that proper bubbly must be hand made stuff, made from only the noblest of grapes. This is a classic Prosecco styling, the version which combines the varietal's aromatic quality with the exalted sapidity of its fine bubbles. To be opened for a dolce vita, anywhere and at anytime.
$1499each
$179DOZEN
Ingoldby Shiraz INGOLDBY ARE ONE OF MCLAREN VALE'S MOST EMINENT WINEGROWING FAMILIES. What they do, they do very well, achieving international acclaim ever since taking the decision to bottle fruit under their own label. The star in the crown of a curiously limited range of value packed wines by gifted growers who have been nurturing their vines for generations, Ingoldby Shiraz has claimed a swathe of wine show awards and amassed a breathtaking list of critical renown. For cohorts of great red wine who aspire to the smooth and seamless style of McLaren Vale Shiraz.
Clive Paton planted
the originally bare, stony 12-acre home paddock at the edge of the Martinborough village in 1980, one of a handful of people who pioneered grape growing in Martinborough
Ata Rangi means new beginning or dawn sky. The site was a barren 5-hectare paddock when Clive Paton bought it in 1980. He was one of a handful of winemaking pioneers in Martinborough, then a forgotten rural settlement, who were attracted to the area by three key features - the localised, free-draining shingle terrace some 20 metres deep, the lowest rainfall records of anywhere in the North Island, and the proximity to the capital city of Wellington, just an hour away. Clive, who'd farmed in the area, knew the land well. He chose mainly red varieties - Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah - and set out in pursuit of world class wines. Pinot Noir's potential shone from the start - the early wines widely appreciated for their texture and for their pure fruit expression of the variety.
 Ata Rangi

The early days were tough with no income, trees or shelter belts (the Wairarapa is renowned for its relentless, drying nor-westers) and little experience. The first winemakers persevered, sharing knowledge and ideas, as well as equipment and winery space. Clive grew pumpkins and garlic between the rows, carting them to the markets in Wellington.

Clive called Auckland winemaker Malcolm Abel and volunteered to work a vintage. He knew that Malcolm was also chasing premium pinot noir, and the two soon became close friends. Malcolm gave Clive some promising pinot cuttings, the offspring of a single vine cutting allegedly taken by a traveller from Burgundy’s finest estate, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti. The illegal cutting had been intercepted and confiscated at Auckland airport, where Malcolm, coincidentally, was working as a customs officer in the mid seventies.

To this day, the Abel Clone, or Gumboot Clone (legend has it the nicked cutting was secreted inside a Kiwi gumboot!) remains at the heart of Ata Rangi Pinot Noir. Every Pinot enthusiast adores the texture, and length of palate it delivers. Its tannins are substantial, yet are incredibly silky and fine. From wthin the Ata Rangi site, it brings dark cherry, and a brooding, savoury feel.

Clive's faith in the area has paid off immensely. Ata Rangi Pinot Noirs have three times won the coveted Bouchard-Finlayson Trophy for Best Pinot Noir at the International Wine and Spirit Competition in London. This international recognition came after a decade of gold medal and trophy successes in Australasian wine competitions. Today the wines enjoy an enviable international reputation, with listings in many of the finest restaurants of the world. As Bob Campbell MW notes "It's true - Ata Rangi has the Midas touch with all of its wines."

Ata Rangi and the family team have gradually expanded since those early days. Clive's sister Alison, who'd been working in the wine trade in London, purchased 2 hectares adjoining the original block in 1982. Particular effort goes into achieving balanced vines, delivering consistently ripe, quality bunches. Hand leaf plucking over the summer ensures open canopies. Yields are very low, typically 1 to 2 T/acre (3 T/hectare). This is due to the usually cool, very windy spring weather which affects fruit set and also to the lean, stony soils which are low in vigour and fertility. All grapes are hand-picked. Many of the vines are now 27 years old, a factor in the wines ascending quality, as is this hands-on emphasis in the vineyard. Sustainability and soil health are our goals - read more about this on the Environment page.

Beelgara Estate Winery
is located in the village of Beelbangera, just outside the town of Griffith in the heartland of the Riverina district in New South Wales
The Beelgara name means native companion in Australia's Aboriginal indigenous language. While Beelgara Estate has a rich resource in quality fruit from the Riverina, it also sources parcels of cool climate wines from the Clare Valley, Adelaide Hills, Coonawarra and Yarra Valley to build a truly comprehensive Australian range of wines. Beelgara brings the warmth and generosity of Australia's wines to every corner of the world. Beelgara's strengths lie with the quality of it's wines and the commitment shown by the stakeholders. Quality and value is the key. The goal is to be approachable, affordable and accessible. Beelgara know that as soon as a person samples their wines, that they are completely won over.
 Beelgara

Beelgara Estate was originally built in 1926 by the migrant the Rossetto family. In 2001 the Tooheys purchased the operation and renamed it Beelgara Estate after the estate vineyard. John Toohey and Peter Toohey have a serious commitment to premium winemaking. Significant investment has been made in the technology and Beelgara is now ranked as Australia's 20th largest winemaker.

The Riverina's long dry summers are highly suitable for grape growing. Rainfall occurs in winter and spring and during the summer growing system water is supplemented in the vineyards using high technology drip irrigation. Climatic conditions support reliable grape growing with moderate to high yields and minimal disease load.

The region's humid autumn conditions favour the development of the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Selected blocks of Semillon grapes are left on the vine post maturity for the noble rot to shrivel the grapes, evaporating the water content and concentrating the sugar and acid levels, thereby creating the luscious Sauternes style dessert wine, for which the region is internationally reknowned.

Beelgara Estate crushed 12,000 tonne of premium grapes in vintage 2008. The wineworks boast modern chilled stainless steel tanks that preserve the fruit characters of all varietal wines. The estate cellar door is arguably one of Australia's finest. State-of-the-art design and a modern layout ensures a memorable experience for tourists and wine enthusiasts visiting the historical Beelbangera winery.

Capital investment have included the installation of a Bucher Xpert 450 Air Bag Press which can batch process a hundred tonnes of grapes every four to six hours, a Must Chiller allowing 10 degrees C of heat to be removed from must (which significantly improves quality) and the installation of a Micro Oxidation Unit, Flotation unit and new prebottling hall, all of which were installed prior to the 2008 vintage. In anticipation of further bumper vintages, new grape receival bins were also installed. The fruit of the labour is already coming to light. After a massive investment, Beelgara are beginning to amass a swag of medals, including 2 silvers in the prestigious International Wine & Spirit Competition in London.

Terra Felix was
originally launched as the second label to the highly respected Tallarook Wines and grew to become a premium winemaking estate
Using excess grapes from Tallarook and surrounding vineyards, Terra Felix immediately caught the attention of wine reviewers. The initial vintages concentrated on commercial varieties such as Shiraz, Merlot Cabernet and Chardonnay. The problem facing the fledging brand was that there were plenty of these wines available on the market and distribution was a challenge. It was decided that Terra Felix should reposition its offering and concentrate largely on using Northern Rhone grape varieties. And why not? The growing conditions, soil and climate around Tallarook bear an uncanny resemblance to Northern Rhone.
 Terra Felix

The Goulburn region has shown a natural affinity with the Northern RhĂ´ne varieties. In January 2003, the region was awarded its own GI (Geographical Indicator) recognition. Shiraz, Marsanne, Roussanne and Viognier, all flourish here, not surprising considering the uncanny similarities between the two regions. Steep granite slopes falling away to alluvial valley floors; a continental climate with comparable sun hours, rainfall and heat summations.

The Shiraz therefore became a Shiraz Viognier, the Merlot Cabernet was replaced with a Mourvedre; a Marsanne Roussanne was introduced, and only the Chardonnay remained from the initial offering. Those who know the Tallarook Chardonnay will understand why Chardonnay survived. Simply the fruit was too good to pass over. With the release of the new varieties in 2004, Terra Felix started to gain momentum in its growth.

Tallarook acquired a contract winery in the Yarra Valley called Master Winemakers. Winemaker Terry Barrett came with an impressive pedigree, most recently he had been chief at Brown Brothers. There his role required him to run the entire Operating Division which included internal and external grape supply, winemaking, and packaging. He was responsible for wine that had won over 50 trophies and 200 gold medals at national and international wine shows. He led innovation at Brown Brothers with the introduction of Italian and Spanish grape varieties as well as the flagship Patricia Range of wines.

By the end of 2005 Terra Felix was emerging as a strong business in its own right. It was decided that the Board of Terra Felix would split and three members would buy out the initial owner. A close relationship was maintained with Tallarook through grape supply and wine making at Master Winemakers. Winemakers Terry Barrett and Trina Smith continued their passion to make Terra Felix a highly recognised brand. Their efforts culminated in the 2005 Terra Felix Shiraz Viognier being awarded Wine of the Year by the Penguin Good Australian Wine guide. Terra Felix was being taken seriously indeed.

At the behest of winemaker Terry Barrett, vinification moved to Mitchelton where Terry could make Terra Felix utilising a much more sophisticated infrastructure than he had at his disposal. He also was keen to lock in supply of very high quality fruit. This required finding vineyards that were prepared to partner Terra Felix in their plans to grow the brand in Australia and at the export market. Today, the fruit for Terra Felix is grown by a number of small family owned vineyards from around the region of the Upper Goulburn, an area which is becoming renowned internationally as source of some of Australia's finest wines.

Hay Shed Hill
is a classic old vineyard in the heart of the Willyabrup Valley, where the region’s first vines were planted and the great tradition of Margaret River wine began
The Hay Shed Hill property was a group settlement farm for returned soldiers from the 1st World War and was originally established as a diary farm. The current homestead, considerably renovated, still has much of the original Group Settlement look and feel. Vines were first planted in 1973 to the varieties which have put Margaret River on the wine map; Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc. The property was known as Sussex Vale until 1989 when it was bought by Barry & Liz Morrison. The Morrison’s were instrumental in establishing what you see today, managing to turn a fairly run down farm with a few vines into a quality grape producer with nearly 18 ha of vines. The place was planted right, the right varieties on the right slopes with the right soils. The winemakers today enjoy the advantage of working with truly mature vines.
 Hay Shed Hill

As the old hay shed from the dairy days was a local landmark, the Morrison’s used this to create the new name for the property, Hay Shed Hill. Tools found in the hay shed provided them with the inspiration for Hay Shed’s sister label – Pitchfork Wines. In 1992 the winery was redesigned by a local architect to complement the existing house and hay shed. The effect is a visually stunning structure, which complements the existing buildings and is both striking and charming when viewed upon approach to the winery.

The Morrison’s owned the property for 11 years until 2000 when they sold to a wine investment group based in New South Wales. In 2002 the property and business was sold to Australian Wine Holdings Limited. The current winemakers bought back the farm in late 2006 and began the revival of this great vineyard and wine brand commencing with major vineyard investment and the re-design and renewal of the wine branding and labels.

Michael Kerrigan, formally the Chief Winemaker of Howard Park and MadFish Wines for the previous 12 years and a small group of partners took over the Hay Shed Hill vineyard and brands just before Christmas 2006. He was familiar with the Hay Shed Hill vineyard and its potential. He could not pass up an opportunity to be part of such an exciting winery that is producing Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon wines as good as or better than any wine producer in Margaret River – and that means world class wine.

Hay Shed Hill vineyard has the mission of producing world class wines that reflect the place of their origin; wines of depth and flavour that are true to region and true to the vineyard. Small, old, hands-on vineyards and wineries like Hay Shed Hill need to be owned and run by winemakers and grape growers; people who are attached to the land and the place and wish to express its character through the wine. In the end corporations shouldn’t run boutique wine businesses.

What makes a good vineyard? If you want to make good wine you need to start with good fruit from a good vineyard. Winemakers have bought back the farm. A good vineyard has all the attributes of regional climate, in Hay Shed Hill's case the kind maritime conditions of the southwest Cape of Western Australia with its mild temperatures and dry summers – remarkably similar to the conditions of Bordeaux. Good soil, well drained gravelly loams. But most important are the individual site characteristics which have a major influence on the weather and local climate experienced by the vines. The Hay Shed Hill site is hilly with wonderful north facing slopes giving maximum sun light to the Cabernet Sauvignon and south facing slopes reducing the heat load on the Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The property is an outstanding site combining the attributes of fully mature vines with distinctive soil type and the mild weather conditions of the area to produce some of the best fruit from the region. The right varieties planted to the right slopes.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services