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Delas Condrieu Clos Boucher
$14999each
$1799DOZEN
 
Tahbilk 1927 Vines Marsanne
From one of the oldest productive blocks of Marsanne in the world
$3799each
$455DOZEN
An Opulent White Wine Of Remarkable Complexity The pick of fruit from this very special patch of ancient vines is crafted into a wine that's built to age beautifully in bottle initially brooding and water white, evolving luxurious caramelled characters while unravelling layers of flavour. Within a few short years of inaugural release, 1927 Vines Marsanne continues to claim a breathtaking number of significant trophies, dozens of gold medals and countless accolades from the industry press.
From South Australia's
Barossa
$2199each
$263DOZEN
Wolf Blass Gold Label Barossa Cabernet 2013
Deep crimson with purple hues. Rich in dark aromatics of black cherry, currant and blackberries, seasoned by leafy undertones of tobacco and wild herb. A fresh and juicy, concentrated wine on a full bodied, focused and precise palate supported by long, textural tannins, balanced acidity, elegant line and persistent flavour.
$15999each
$1919DOZEN
Saltram The Eighth Maker Jimmy Watson Shiraz 2002 WINNER OF THE 2003 JIMMY WATSON TROPHY, the most hotly contested since the extraordinary 1998 vintage. Growing season 2002 produced some of the most spectacular wines in living memory. Temperatures were some of the coolest on record, allowing the old vines to slowly and steadily ripen some of the most intense, rich and well structured grapes ever harvested. Launched at a very special black tie dinner at Queen's Hall, Eighth Maker is brimming with complex fruit, spice and earth characters, a reflection of the unique soil profiles and age of vines.
$2399each
$287DOZEN
Buller Fine Old Tawny BLESSED WITH A SUNNY CLIMATE, good soils and ample water, the Buller vineyards at Beverford, nestled within the Swan Hill region, produce the richest, nut and citrus flavoured Old Tawny wines which can rival the finest in Victoria. A generously flavoured Old Port in the traditional style, Buller is endowed with great complexity. Sweet fruit and beautifully integrated oak combine to display all the developed characters of long term ageing. Along with the slow transformation in colour from bright ruby to deep tawny, have arrived the most exquisite changes of flavour.
$2099each
$251DOZEN
Kellermeister Sable Chocolate Port AN INDULGENT RUBY BAROSSA PORT FOR HEDONISTS WHO ALSO LOVE THEIR CHOCOLATE. Quite frankly, not a frivolous drink by any measure, but a seriously well made Barossa fortified wine that's been steeped in fine dark German chocolate, a concoction of spices and three year old Brandy. An immensely pleasureable wine to accompany your coffee and your dessert, or to set the background for those special moments. Discover ecstasy, unwind and relax in front of a DVD or cosy wood fire, with just any old lover, and Kellermeister Sable.
$1499each
$179DOZEN
Maglieri Merlot 2008 MAGLIERI HAS ENJOYED MUCH INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS OVER THE PAST THIRTY YEARS. With an enviable list of accolades and awards, Maglieri is well known for producing red wines with the greatest poise, full of charm and character, the first growth in pure McLaren Vale Merlot.
David Pettavel pioneered
the establishment of the Geelong wine region in 1842, the industry's early successes are a tribute to Pettavel's accurate assessment of the climatic and geological influences of the region
David Pettavel left Switzerland and emigrated to Australia in 1842 aboard the barque Platina. Upon landing at Port Philip, Pettavel continued directly to the hills of Geelong to plant the region's first vineyard. These vineyards, and the wine produced from them were such a success that Pettavel immediately began plans for further vineyard development throughout the rolling hills of Geelong. The shortage of skilled labour became a major constraint to Pettavel's expansion, so Pettavel returned to Switzerland, and sailed back to Australia aboard the ship the Evening Star in 1856 after convincing family and friends to follow him to Australia.
 Pettavel

The rapid expansion and development of the wine industry in Geelong halted abruptly in the late 1870s with the passing of Pettavel, and the arrival of phylloxera which devastated the vineyards. The nearby gold rush also proved a temptation too great for many vigneron's, and labour shortages prevented vineyards from being replanted.

Michael Francis Fitzpatrick purchased land in Australia from his homeland in Ireland through an indenture scheme before emigrating to start a new life in the far away country. Michael Francis was one of the first arrivals to the Mildura region and spent his early years constructing irrigation channels that would later allow him to plant and grow grapes. Mike Fitzpatrick, grandson of Michael Francis, and his wife Sandi have continued developing the family trade of grape growing.

Pettavel is ideally located in a vineyard setting on the outskirts of Geelong, close to the start of the Great Ocean Road and associated coastal towns. The search for cooler climate production led Mike and Sandi to Geelong and in 1990 they began developing vineyards in Sutherlands Creek. Such was the quality of the grapes produced that the natural progression of constructing a winery, the second for the Fitzpatrick's, was undertaken.

Pettavel opened its doors in December 2001, welcoming the first visitors to the cellar door and diners to the restaurant with the release of the 2000 vintage wines. Since opening Pettavel has been the recipient of numerous industry awards and reviews for its food and Pettavel has developed a reputation as a leading regional destination. Robyn Fitzpatrick, Mike and Sandi's daughter, is Pettavel’s General Manager. Robyn is a dedicated member of many wine and tourism committees and is passionate about promoting the Geelong wine region. Her role extends outside Pettavel, as Executive Board Member for the Geelong Winegrowers Association and Board Member for Geelong Otway Tourism.

In recent years the Geelong region has experienced rapid growth and redevelopment of the once thriving wine industry. The region now boasts over 50 independent wine producers located across a three sub-regions, the Moorabool Valley, the Surf Coast and the Bellarine Peninsula, within the greater Geelong Geographic Index. These sub-regions vary vastly in terms of climatic influence, from the maritime influenced Bellarine Peninsula and coastal towns to the continental influenced inland regions of Sutherlands Creek and Bannockburn. These varying climatic influences allow the Geelong region to produce a broad range of grape varieties and associated wine styles, offering numerous options for wine drinkers.

Pirie Tasmania is
the latest evolution of one man's belief that Tasmania can be one of the truly great wine regions of the world
The Tamar Valley is situated in the north of Tasmania at a latitude of around 41-42° south. Approximately the same length as the Cote d'Or in Burgundy (90km) and with a similar cool, humid climate, vineyards occupy favoured N/NE facing sites predominantly along the west bank of the river. Chardonnay, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer are all grown here, producing fresh, extremely elegant whites. But for red wines, Pinot Noir is king. From the bright cherry and raspberry scented wines from Kayena in the Lower Tamar, to the heady truffle and black cherry aromas from the Upper Tamar vineyards at Relbia and White Hills, the variety of styles from this small region prove that the French do not have a monopoly on terroir.
 Pirie

From pruning to picking, specific low yielding blocks are tightly managed to ensure that the fruit reaches its maximum potential. In the winery, small parcels are individually nurtured in order to achieve the greatest character and expression of place. As part of their traditional styling, a significant contribution to the evolution of these wines is provided by bottle age and therefore, these wines will not reach their full potential until some years after release.

Every now and then, whether through the vagueries of vineyard or winery, one of the parcels will raise itself above the crowd and show truly outstanding qualities. When this happens, (always providing that in doing so, the Estate wines are not compromised in any way,) the wine will be bottled seperately. Often, although not always, these wines require greater time in both winery and cellar and will be released at a later date.

Surely one of the best views of any winery in the world, the winemaking heart of Pirie has always been at Rosevears Estate on the West Tamar. Quality is paramount and, although small, the winery can boast computer controlled heating and cooling on all tanks, a range of red fermenters, from traditional small open vats to a state-of-the-art rotating vinimatic, plus a well-equiped lab. With tank sizes down to 500 litres, the ability to give individual attention to small parcels of wine is essential, not only for the estate wines, but also for the number of small local growers whose wines are made under contract.

The estate's South label is about producing fresh, aromatic wines to complement modern food styles, using the finesse of northern Tasmanian fruit. The combination of a truly cool climate and summer rainfall, features which we share with northern France and New Zealand, make Tasmania particularly well suited to the production of these early-drinking wine styles.

Glenwood vineyard at Relbia is a NE facing 85ha property approximately 10km south of Launceston and 3km east of the airport where the North Esk River cuts through short, rolling hills on it’s way to feed the River Tamar. Pirie Tasmania draws fruit only from selected blocks, predominantly Pinot Noir. Protected both from significant maritime effects and the dominant influence of the Tamar itself, Relbia’s maximum elevation of 140m results in cooler maximum and colder minimum temperatures than in the Tamar Valley north of Launceston. White Hills vineyard is a high, steeply sloping 84ha property approximately 10km south of Launceston and 2km east of Relbia. Multiple aspects make it suitable for a number of varieties, including some Pinot and Chardonnay for sparkling. Like Relbia, it is protected both from significant maritime effects and the dominant influence of the River Tamar. Higher altitude (up to 170m) and greater exposure result in even cooler temperatures. The summit can be vulnerable to frost in some years.

Great wines are
made in the vineyard and it is the exceptional fruit grown at the Kayena Vineyard that forms the cornerstone of the Tamar Ridge and Devil’s Corner range of wines
Located on the western banks of the Tamar River, 40 kilometres north of Launceston, the Kayena Vineyard is planted to a range of cool climate varieties including Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Employing state-of-the-art winemaking techniques, but with more than a few concessions to the traditional techniques that have served winemakers for centuries, our winemaking goal is to harness the pristine fruit characters the Kayena Vineyard produces, fashioning them into individual wine styles that speak of their cool origins.
 Tamar Ridge

The Kayena Vineyard range of wines offers pristine varietal definition, great purity of fruit character, and the refreshing acidity which is the hallmark of genuine cool climate wine. Only grapes grown, made and bottled at the Kayena Vineyard are selected for this range of wines. The Devil’s Corner is a section of the Tamar River near the Kayena Vineyard. It is a calm area of refuge for sailors away from the potentially wild waters of Whirlpool Reach to the south, and has been used as such for over 200 years. The Devil’s Corner wines are pure, crisp and refreshing, displaying vibrant fruit qualities and great drinkability. Wines to be savoured now rather than cellared.

Vineyards were first established in Tasmania during colonial settlement. Only in relatively recent years, however, has viticulture emerged in the beautiful Tamar Valley to forge a reputation for varietal and sparkling wines of the highest quality. In less than a decade Tamar Ridge Wines has established its own acclaimed success story as part of Tasmania’s modern wine industry. The first vines were planted at Tamar Ridge in 1994, and the first vintage was released five years later in 1999. The company continues to grow strongly and is today a leading producer of Tasmanian cool climate table wines with sales in every Australian state and a growing list of export markets.

Great wines are made in the vineyard and every effort is made at Tamar Ridge Wines to grow exceptional grapes. From the West Tamar vineyards, the focus on the varieties ideally suited to the region’s distinct viticultural landscape. Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Gewurztraminer, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are all grown on Scott Henry trellising which is favoured for its split-canopy design which allows maximum fruit exposure to the sun.

Wine quality is the primary objective, consistently achieved through attention to detail and control of the entire process from grape growing, through winemaking, packaging and marketing of the final wine. The result is wines of the highest quality that are certifiably 100% Tasmanian and reflect the natural variations that are engendered by climate, soil, topography and winemaking practices.

A variety of clones has been planted throughout the vineyard, with each block – and on occasion rows – managed individually to maximise fruit quality from the specific site. Our viticultural team takes a very ‘hands-on’ approach to the management of the vineyard with all vines hand-pruned and much of the harvest carried out by hand. The aim of all this effort is to produce grapes that display pristine fruit flavours, distinctive varietal character and a personality that allows our wine-makers to fashion quite individual wine styles.

Frankland Estate was
established in 1988 by Barrie Smith and Judi Cullam, they continue to be actively involved in every aspect of the vineyard and winery
They are assisted by a small, hardworking team who enjoy the diverse and idiosyncratic challenges associated with making wine. The Isolation Ridge vineyard lies on part of a farm where the family have run a wool growing enterprise since 1974. The decision to diversify their farming interests was inspired and informed by a tour of French vineyards Barrie and Judi undertook in 1985 and also by two vintages they worked at Chateau Senejac in Bordeaux. The winemaking philosophies at Frankland Estate reflect these influences as well as the hard earned lessons gained from some 17 vintages in the Frankland River region. Their approach to winemaking is based on the principle that the most significant characteristics of a wine come from the soil and the vineyard environment. They aim to make wines that reflect nature rather than the hand of the winemaker.
 Frankland Estate

This is the basis of Frankland Estate's commitment to sustainable farming and to working the land in accord with the cycles of nature. The team carefully nurtures the health of the soil in the vineyard and only take from the vineyards as much as can be replaced by natural processes. The use of sustainable viticultural practices have won organic certification. It is already evident in the complexity, depth and intensity of flavour in the wines. Like many winemakers Frankland Estate subscribe to the view that great wines are made in the vineyard not the winery. They look to the soils in the vineyards to provide the foundation for healthy vines, intensely flavoured fruit and wines that articulate the distinctive features of the environment in which they are grown.

Frankland River is the coolest and most isolated winegrowing region in Western Australia. Over millions of years the Frankland River has cut through the region’s ancient surface rocks to create gravelloam soils of moderate fertility that are ideal for growing grapes. The river valley also has a crucial influence on the region’s climate.

In winter and spring it sucks cold air down to the Southern Ocean (about 40 kms south of the vineyard) during the night creating air circulation between land and sea that minimises the danger of vine damaging frosts. In summer it funnels cool and humid air north from the ocean moderating the afternoon heat to provide a long, slow ripening period for grapes.

Frankland Estate draws on two different sources of fruit for its wines. Fruit for Isolation Ridge Vineyard is grown in the evocatively named vineyard surrounding the winery. This vineyard is managed by the Frankland Estate team using organic grape growing principles. Fruit for the estate's single vineyard rieslings and for the Rocky Gully range of wines is sourced from other growers in the Frankland River region who share a commitment to sustainable agriculture and high quality fruit.

The Isolation Ridge vineyard sits high on an ironstone ridge with ancient duplex soils of gravel and loam over a clay subsoil. The first vines were planted in 1988 and the vineyard has been progressively expanded to the current 30 hectares. Organic grape growing principles prohibit the use of synthetic fertilisers, pesticides, fungicides and plant growth hormones. Instead, reliance is placed on midrow cultivation, recycled winery waste, animal manures and a range of composting and mulching techniques to increase soil fertility and encourage biodiversity within the vineyard. Fungal diseases are kept under control with sulphur and copper sprays and the resident flock of guinea fowl keep a diligent watch over insect, aphid and mite activity.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services