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From Victoria's
Yarra Valley
$2299each
$275DOZEN
Diamond Valley Chardonnay 2010
Vibrant mid straw hue. Bouquet shows youthful yet complex aromas of honeysuckle and white peach, lemons, melon and butternut squash. A ripe, fully developed palate with a piercing steeliness in support of honeyed melon and caramelized peach characters. A bright yet drying multi layered mouthfeel, vibrant with stonefruit and finishing with a smooth creaminess.
The Margaret River's salubrious maritime climate of mild
Evans Tate Metricup Road Semillon Sauvignon 2015
$1699each
$203DOZEN
WET WINTERS AND WARM. even summers. produces Sauvignon Blanc that's more tropical in style than the grassy herbaceousness of cooler districts. Margaret River Semillon is generally noted for its thistle/ vegetative qualities and for the weight and structure it carries. Fruit sourced from the cooler Karridale precinct and a very protected site in Wilyabrup coalesce into a unique style of wine which best articulates the exhilarating vitality of the classically dry Margaret River white. .
From South Australia's
Barossa
$3299each
$395DOZEN
Charles Cimicky Autograph Shiraz
Deep scarlet colour. Rich bouquets, opulent with generous dark fruits, heady, aromatic, liquorice and cedar, blackberry and prune. A palate of dark chocolate and espresso, complex spice, the fruit, oak and tannins are inseparable.
$2699each
$323DOZEN
Dog Point Sauvignon Blanc DOG POINT TOOK THE WINE WORLD BY STORM, purely on the basis of its exceptional Sauvignon Blanc. One of the oldest vineyards in Marlborough, Dog Point sold grapes to other companies until they began bottling wine under their own label. Topography, the lie of land and quality of soils are crucial to the character of Marlborough's remarkable world class vintages. Dog Point's vines are mostly planted to free draining silty clay loams on the flatter aspects of Marlborough, salubrious soils which infuse grapes with luscious citrus and grapefruit flavours.
$1999each
$239DOZEN
Wynns Coonawarra Cabernet Shiraz Merlot BLACK LABEL DEFINES THE ELEGANCE AND EXCELLENCE OF GRAND COONAWARRA WINE, an enduring classic that drinks brilliantly while young. Cabernet Sauvignon provides the flavour, structure and length, Shiraz imparts a spicey complexity and richness. Merlot adds softness to a finely structured and supple wine, showing ripe plum and spicy fruit flavours combined with soft, understated oak. A smooth and flavoursome red enhanced by a judicious balance of the three varietal components, fashioned to be enjoyed today, innately suited to all good faire.
$1799each
$215DOZEN
Grant Burge Lily Farm Frontignac LILY FARM IS THE VINEYARD IN FRONT OF GRANT'S HOUSE NEAR TANUNDA, planted to vine some thirty years ago. Frontignac is a wine that typifies the fruit from which it is made, showing a distinctively, pleasant grape flavour. Frontignanc is unique amongst varietals in that the wine actually tastes and smells of ripe, luscious grapes. Grant Burge make a style of Frontignac that's more generous and engaging, the sweetness of fruit is matched by an adults only complexity, multi dimensional with vivid aromatics and layers of fruit.
$1799each
$215DOZEN
Blue Pyrenees Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 BLUE PYRENEES WAS ESTABLISHED AS CHATEAU REMY IN 1963 BY REMY MARTIN OF FRANCE AND HAS SINCE BECOME WELL KNOWN FOR THEIR BORDEAUX STYLED CABERNET SAUVIGNON. The estate was developed under advisement of the great Colin Preece and Maurice O'Shea's Hunter Valley management team. Victoria's Pyrenees have since become renowned for statuesque Cabernet wines, displaying great complexity, superior concentration and definitive regionality. Very few viticultural precincts in Australia can lay claim to doing Cabernet so very well and so consistently.
Ten Minutes By
Tractor are focused on the highest quality fruit to make wines which are a compelling expression of the Mornington Peninsula
Ten Minutes By Tractor grow Pinot Noir and Chardonnay on all three of their home vineyards, each of which are ten minutes by tractor apart. The McCutcheon, Wallis and Judd vineyards are all within the Main Ridge subregion, one of the coolest and highest parts of the Mornington Peninsula. In addition to Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Tempranillo are also grown on the Wallis Vineyard and Sauvignon Blanc on the Judd Vineyard. The team meticulously manage their three vineyards to vertical shoot positioning, leaf plucking, hedging, bunch thinning and harvesting, all of which are done by hand.
 Ten Minutes By Tractor

Each block on each vineyard is picked and vinified separately, allowing us maximum flexibility just before bottling to identify the best performing blocks and vineyards to be able to release single vineyard wines or to select the best blends. Ten Minutes By Tractor have a non-interventionist approach to winemaking, adopting traditional winemaking techniques that help to enhance the wonderful flavours, complexity, elegance and length of palate for which their wines have become renowned.

All wines (except for the tank fermented Sauvignon Blanc) are fermented by using the indigenous or wild yeasts that reside in the vineyard, on the skins of grapes and the winery. Pinot Noir is aged for 12 to 18 months in French oak barriques and lightly fined. Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and barrel fermented Sauvignon Blanc are also fermented in French oak barrels. All wines are bottled under screwcap to prevent cork taint, random oxidation and to preserve the pristine characters of the wines.

Blending decisions are made just prior to bottling, at which time the blends and single vineyard releases are chosen. The craft of winemaking is a process of continual learning and discovery. Ten Minutes By Tractor strive for continual improvement on all that they do. The team are passionate about the challenge of understanding everything that contributes to the quality of wines.

Growing up in
a winemaking family in the winemaking community of West Auckland, Matua Valley's founders Ross and Bill Spence developed a vision for New Zealand's future
Back in the early 70’s, the vision of Matua Valley’s founders Ross and Bill Spence was to revolutionise the still fledgling New Zealand wine industry, taking advantage of unique regional qualities to create innovative and distinguished wines – the kind they wanted to drink themselves. They succeeded, beyond their wildest dreams. Today, Matua Valley wines are acclaimed and highly sought after throughout the world.
 Matua

After six years developing their craft in the industry, the brothers established the Matua Valley winery in 1973. From their first successful vintage, produced in the old Tin Shed at Auckland, the brothers went on to win awards and accolades from Sydney to London. Their greatest achievement in these early days was the production of the first New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. Today, Matua Valley is well on the way to becoming a globally respected fine wine brand. Such recognition will be the Spence brothers ultimate achievement, and a benchmark for other New Zealand winemakers to aspire to.

Viticulture is the science, art, or process of cultivating grape vines. Matua Valley have always had a hands on approach to this science and art. The philosophy is simple, to produce the best quality fruit possible, with consistency from vintage to vintage. But simple doesn't mean easy - there's a lot of hard work involved. The winemakers at Matua are fortunate to have a member of the founding family, Simon Spence, managing both the company-owned vineyards and the contract growers. His role is to keep a close eye on all the vineyards, ensuring maximum productivity and consistent quality. These goals are achieved by harnessing particular viticultural techniques for each vineyard based on their terrior, a combination of topography, soil and climatic conditions.

Mark Robertson, formerly Matua's chief winemaker, credits Simon's results in the vineyard as one of the key factors in achieving our superior quality wines. Grapevines go through an annual cycle, involving a time-honoured series of viticultural tasks. Dormant over the winter, the vines are pruned, shoots are trained and extra foliage is plucked by hand to give the grapes maximum sunlight exposure and to concentrate the flavours. Matua monitors the vines throughout the growth cycle, looking for any sign of pests or disease. As members of a sustainable wine growing programme, the Matua vignerons intervene at the last possible moment to minimise spray requirements.

Thinning of the vines is carried out systematically to ensure a balanced fruit to leaf/vine ratio, and to maximise quality. Netting of the vines is conducted to provide protection from birds. Picking is only done at the time of optimum ripeness and flavour development, in close consultation between the viticulturalists and the winemakers.

Matua's winemakers are wine lovers, always looking for new ideas and applying the best of them to the production of the wines. They rely heavily on optimally ripe fruit to make the distinctive wines. Special pride is taken in the produce extracted from the older vineyards. The last twenty five years have seen the gradual evolution of some very special styles which are getting better with each vintage. Winemaking is an art, a craft and a science that has evolved over many centuries. Like all crafts, it improves with repeated practice and with the judicious combination of ancient techniques and modern technology.

The Seabrook Family
have been part of the Australian wine business since 1878, starting one of the country’s most respected wine companies W.J Seabrook & Son
Seabrook Wines is an artisan winemaker who works with growers to source exceptional fruit from the top regions around Australia and make premium wine to sell both domestically and into the international market. The business is family owned and operated out of the Barossa Valley where their estate vineyard and winery is located at the base of Menglers Hill in Tanunda. Since their first vintage in 2005 Seabrook wines have been awarded Haliday’s 5 star rating for the winery as well as several wine show medals.
 Seabrook

WJ Seabrook started a wine brokers business in Melbourne back in 1878 assessing wine from many regions of Australia. His son T.C. followed his father as an acclaimed judge for 35 years and began working at the family wine business. Typically, the trade was in hogsheads, but wicker-covered, ceramic demijohns and special bottles of wine were also sold direct to the public.

After 1940 W. J. Seabrook & Son evolved more along the lines of a classic English wine merchant. The firm imported and exported wines, and began to produce it’s own blends under the Seabrook label. T.C.’s son, Doug continued in the family wine business and was chairman of judges at the RMWS for more than 30 years. Doug’s son, Iain took the family baton and worked in the family business from 1964. Douglas, who suffered from the effects of poliomyelitis, sold the family business in 1976 and retired, but this was not the end of Seabrook wines.

Seabrook Wines re-launced itself in 2005 after several years lying dormant. Fifth generation winemaker, Hamish Seabrook has revitalised the old 1878 family label and as his forefathers did, is hand sourcing fruit from some of the best regions Australia has to offer, which to date includes shiraz from both the Pyrenees in Victoria and the Barossa Valley, South Australia.

Hamish studied winemaking at Roseworthy and has worked as winemaker at Bests Wines Great Western, Senior Winemaker/winery manager at Brown Brothers Milawa, and is currently working as winemaker at Dorrien Estate in the Barossa as well as managing Seabrook wines with his wife Joanne.

Hamish is the proud recipient of the Dux Len Evans Tutorial and judges regularly at several shows around Australia including the Royal Melbourne Wine Show, Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Rutherglen, Seymour, and several additional regional shows. The Seabrook Clan have set an all-Australian record in wine judging at Royal Melbourne Wine Show with five generations as a wine judge, three of which have served as chairman of judges.

The Pyrenees region
of Central Victoria is the third oldest of the State's vignobles
The mountain range was named by the noted explorer and surveyor Major Thomas Mitchell, for its raw beauty and similarities to the Pyrenees in south western France, where Mitchell had served as a young Army officer. The first grower of vines for winemaking in the Avoca area was a man named MacKereth, who planted his vines in 1848. His vineyards grew to supply the thirsty miners working in the then thriving old mining industry.
 Blue Pyrenees

Over the years, Blue Pyrenees Estate has established a truly unique winestyle that captures the perfect balance between new world high technology and old world tradition. It is interesting that the lake depicted on the Blue Pyrenees Estate labels was originally the site of a gold mine, but on following a gold reef, miners struck an underground spring, which is now the source of a valuable water supply to the Estate.

It was in the early 1960's that the area was recognised for its potential for premium quality wine production with its unique combination of deep gravely soils and cool climate conditions. Following considerable development and experimentation the initial release under the Blue Pyrenees label was the 1982 Blue Pyrenees Estate Reserve Red. The rest, as they say is history.

Today, Blue Pyrenees Estate is the realisation of a desire to create a unique vineyard of superior quality in a recognized premium cool climate wine growing region

The painting on the label is reproduced from the original oil painting by the respected artist Lorrie Banks. It depicts moonlight over the vineyards and was painted in 1985 and represents the Estate signature.

The factors determining terroir are primarily climate, geology and hydrology or soil water relations. The Blue Pyrenees Estate in the Pyrenees of Central Victoria was selected because these factors could be identified in a specific combination ideally suiting premium quality wine production. Research conducted by viticulturists and CSIRO of Australia demonstrates that Blue Pyrenees Estate consistently reaches maturity ten days after Coonawarra, a key reference for cool climate viticulture in this country.

Blue Pyrenees Estate is also the coolest in the Pyrenees region, with a diversity of microclimate and soils enabling each clone, and each variety to be planted in the best situation. The vineyards have been planted along the foothills facing north, at an altitude of 400 metres. Rainfall averages around 630mm, the pattern in most seasons being ideal - mainly in winter and early spring.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services