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The noble cépage of Chardonnay
Taltarni Vintage Brut
$2299each
$275DOZEN
PINOT NOIR AND MEUNIER. finished with the inclusion of parcels from Tasmania's prestigious Clover Hill vineyard. a vintage sparkling of amazing textures and immeasurable palate length. Since inaugural release in 1978. each bottle of Taltarni Brut has been fermented and matured on yeast lees according to Methode traditionelle. Elegant and refined. articulating the sophistication and affable charm which have come to be recognized as the endearing and enduring sparkling Taltarni style. .
Have you ever imagined yourself sipping on a luscious effervescent red wine? Vixen makes makes it very real
Fox Creek Vixen Sparkling Red
$2399each
$287DOZEN
YOUR FRIENDS WILL BE JEALOUS. past party escorts will seem dull by comparison and all eyes will be on you as you stride into your next party with Vixen on your arm. Vixen is McLaren Vale born and bred. a pure estate wine from the Fox Creek vineyards. One of the region's flagships and a stellar performer at national wine competitions. Vixen has been showered with medals. trophies and accolades from around the world. .
 
McGuigan Black Label Red
Rich and flavoursome red wines continue to be an Australian favourite
$999each
$119DOZEN
McGuigan Excel At Delivering Year in and year out The first thing you notice about Black Label are the lovely berry and spice aromas, followed by a generous palate of ripe red/ black fruit characters and tender tannins. Black Label is nicely balanced with splendid concentration and persistence of flavour.
$21999each
$2639DOZEN
Perrier Jouet Belle Epoque Champagne 2007 A WONDERFUL WINE AND AN ENDURING ARTICULATION OF CHARDONNAY FROM COTE DES BLANCS, the noblest of white grapes from the world's premiere appellation, confering immense elegance, lightness and finesse. The traditionally presented Flower-bottle exhibits great balance and refinement in a soft wine of many decades pedigree, Belle Epoque is doubtless one of the world's great wines. A harmonious assemblage embracing the roundness of Pinots Noir and Meuniere, a timeless Champagne of sophistication and style.
$4599each
$551DOZEN
Jansz Vintage Rose IF YOU LIKE EFFERVESCENT PINK WINES YOU WILL POSITIVELY LOVE JANSZ ROSé. Crafted from the crème de la crème of vintage, the realization of a joint venture between Tasmania's finest sparkling wine vineyards and the eminent House of Louis Roederer, all in the pursuit of defining the ultimate Aussie Cuvée. Every block of vines was established with the specific aim to yield fruit exclusively for sparkling wine. Each stage of the winemaking process is made to the timeless Champenoise of true Methode Traditionnelle.
$3799each
$455DOZEN
Kilikanoon Covenant Shiraz VALLEY CLARE PRODUCES SOME OF THE MOST HIGHLY SOUGHT SHIRAZ WINES IN THE WORLD. Just like the French, Kilikanoon make a second tier wine from the same vineyards as the estate flagship Oracle. The best parcels of Clare Valley fruit, from vines up to forty years of age, are selected and assembled to create the terroir based Covenant Shiraz. Intensely varietal with lifted aromas of black olives, a wine of extraordinary power and finesse, as spiced plums and splendid French oak see the fruit through to the stylish, evenly textured finish, seamless and long.
$3399each
$407DOZEN
Majella Cabernet Sauvignon EXCELLENT LANGTONS CLASSIFICATION. One of the Coonawarra's most feted marques in Cabernet Sauvignon. The Majella property was originally acquired for the purpose of grazing lamb. Eric Brand of neighbouring Laira Vineyard offered to buy fruit from Majella if the land was turned over to Cabernet. The site was planted in 1968, much of the vintages that followed went to Wynn's, but it was not until 1993 that Majella vinified and bottled its own estate labelled wine. The inaugural release was enthusiastically received and Majella have never looked back.
Plant a six-inch
nail in this soil, water it and in a year you will have a crowbar
So said John James McWilliam when he arrived in Hanwood in 1913. The development of the Riverina region as a major wine producing area was primarily due to the foresight of the McWilliam family. The Riverina, and Hanwood in particular, was an area John James McWilliam the son of McWilliam's founder, Samuel McWilliam had identified earlier as having the potential to service the growing domestic and export wine markets.
 Hanwood Estate

In 1913, John James McWilliam planted the first vines at Hanwood, just 8kms south of the thriving agricultural town of Griffith in New South Wales; and in 1917 he established McWilliam's Hanwood winery. Today, this same winery is a large modern facility, one of the largest in the region - with an average crush of 18,000 tonnes and a storage capacity of more than 22 million litres.

Not only was he responsible for the trial of premium varieties previously unknown in the district, he was also responsible for leading the way in developing the winery technology necessary to produce table wines in a hot summer climate. Just as John James led the way in 1913, so it was Glen McWilliam that pioneered the region's move into table wines during the mid-1950s.

The Riverina is today credited with producing more than two-thirds of New South Wales wine and almost one-quarter of Australia's total wine production. The constant, even rainfall, rich and fertile soil and warm temperatures during the ripening season make the Riverina ideally suited to viticulture.

McWilliam's Hanwood Estate - one of Australia's leading premium quality wine ranges, is a blend of high quality fruit from a range of vineyard sites within South Eastern Australia. McWilliam's Hanwood Chardonnay is one of the most consistently awarded white wines at its price point and arguably the fastest growing Chardonnay in the domestic market.

Fruit is predominantly sourced from the Riverina and Hilltops regions in New South Wales, the Yarra Valley in Victoria, and Coonawarra in South Australia. The diverse fruit supply provides the winemaking team with a broader range of blending options and enables them to produce a range of wines that are high in quality and consistent in style from one year to the next.

Irvine represents a
super-premium wine brand, a gorgeous vineyard in Eden Valley, South Australia, a truly exciting dream and above all, a grand experience in wine
Irvine is a family name and a family business - the name at the front of the years of hard work and dedication put in by all at Springhill in the Eden Valley, Jim and Marjorie Irvine and winemaker daughter Joanne.
 Irvine

Never in 1959 did James Irvine ever think he would one day own his own property in the ranges above the Eden Valley of South Australia. At that time he was with Thomas Hardy & Sons and was responsible for the purchase of grapes from the Eden Valley area for the production of the famous Siegersdorf Riesling. The area greatly impressed the young Jim Irvine, and he dreamed of some day being able to plant his own vineyard there.

Right from the start quality in all aspects of viticulture, winemaking and packaging has been the driving force, and the Irvine Merlots are already recognised the world over as being equal to the finest produced anywhere in Australia. Total dedication to the task and a willingness to fully age wines in Irvines' own maturation system together with a serious and determined approach, has resulted in wines of extraordinary style, depth of flavour, and intensity of varietal character seldom seen.

Irvine is a name well known in Australian wine history

Hans Irvine (a distant relative) established Great Western, Australia's greatest sparkling wine cellars in 1888. His philosophy to provide sparkling wines and table wines of the highest quality and prestige style was proven and now another Irvine carries this philosophy on in a different way. This Irvine approach has not come overnight. Winemaking experience covers nearly forty years, with Hardy's Siegersdorf, Krondorf, Normans and Lakewood, each having sparkling wine and premium table wine production involved in their overall winemaking.

The Irvine Winery's Springhill vineyard has its own terroir - its location, climate, the Barossan culture plus the modern Australian winemaker interpretation of classic styles, pristine varietal expression, and rarity, and we have an understanding of just what this means. Springhill is composed of acid soils, gravels mostly, and later ripening fruit resultant from cooler autumn temperatures.

The good natural rainfall, the high level drainage and the tough growing conditions all come together to give this terroir or regionality. With these then comes the Baronssan character of the vineyard staff. Their care, understanding, love of vineyards and high work ethic bonds together the natural elements and truly completes Springhill terroir. The wines reflect this most clearly in Grand Merlot, Pinot Gris, Zinfandel, Chardonnay and, when on their own, the Eden Crest Merlot portions. Long flavours, multiple nuances, slightly tighter finish, longevity also comes from these conditions of terroir.

The Wirra Wirra
Cellars were built by Robert Strangways Wigley, one of the McLaren Vale's all time characters
Wigley began building at the turn of the century using Dr. A.C. Kelly's plans of a split-level design that his friend Alec Johnston had used to build the Pirramimma winery. Wirra Wirra is an aboriginal name meaning amongst the gums. Born in 1864, Bob Wigley studied Law and Architecture and managed to play cricket for South Australia. His wild pranks as a young man had already made him somewhat of an embarrassment to his family. In 1893 he was prudently sent to rusticate in McLaren Vale. He planted the vineyard in 1894 and made his first wine with Alec Johnston in 1897. By 1901 he was the owner of one of the best wineries and vineyards in the district with 100 acres under vines and 15 acres under currants.
 Wirra Wirra

Stylistically, Wirra Wirra established a long and distinguished history for itself of producing wines with great elegance, balance and complexity. "Mr. Thomas Hardy says of all those he ever had under him, no town man worked harder than Mr. Bob Wigley who was at Bankside for 18 months learning winemaking. At the end of this time he took up 240 acres of land at McLaren Vale, and has succeeded in producing wonderfully fine full-bodied Burgundy, especially suited for the export trade." - The Register Adelaide Australia 1903

Bob Wigley died in 1924 having contributed much to the life of the district and having made many fine wines which in the main found their way to England, having been shipped by Burgoynes of London. After 1936 the original 240 acres were sold by his family and eventually the cellars with only 7 acres left fell into disuse. It was not until late 1969 that the winery, by then virtually a derelict building, and the surrounding 7 acres of land was re-established.

Cousins Greg and Roger Trott purchased the holding from Vern Sparrow, son of Wigley's foreman Jack Sparrow. Roger Trott, an accountant, has a property at McLaren Flat, Moray Park, and Greg's vineyard. Bethany, is just across the road from Wirra Wirra, while Scrubby Rise, part of the original Wirra Wirra, is immediately in front of the cellars. Before they bought the old, ruined winery, Greg spent five years with Southern Vales Co-operative looking after growers interests and in his own words, had become familiar with the rudiments of winemaking.

Like many of the McLaren Vale winemakers, these men were helped by their friendly rivals, a feature of the district. Good use was made of Oenological Services of McLaren Vale, a winemaking advisory and laboratory service led by Peter Klose and started by David Hardy, Alex Johnston and Colin Kay. In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins.

In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins. In its modern day, Wirra Wirra has hosted a vast and eclectic array of winemakers, cellar hands, drifters and vagrants each vintage. One of the most interesting things about February, is the influx of a range of recalcitrants from all over the world. Yanks, Poms, Krauts, Frogs, Kiwis, Queenslanders, the occasional Aussie and more, all converge on the cellars to pick, pump, drain, crush, press, and massage the fruit that comes in from the vineyards. There is now nothing quirky about the design of the winery, which is in its third stage of development. Although functional and technologically advanced, the cellars retain a soul. This is largely due to the spirit of the tribe that work there.

Robert Crabtree studied
law at Oxford University and was a practising lawyer/ academic at Cambridge, he always had an interest in viticulture and made fruit wines as a hobby
Crabtree's curiosity in winemaking led him to complete two vintages at Bergerac and another in New Zealand, before landing in Australia and deciding that he would become a full time winemaker. After careful selection of possible wine regions, Robert decided that the Clare Valley was to be the region of choice. Whilst studying winemaking at Roseworthy, Robert purchased a small existing property at Watervale in 1980 and named it Watervale Cellars. In 1983 Robert purchased the old Flax Mill building in Auburn. He equipped it as a small (somewhat rough and ready) winery and planted two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The business became known as Crabtree’s Watervale Cellars for a number of years. Robert built an enviable reputation for fine classic Watervale wines over the following 27 years and became a passionate advocate for the Clare Valley and South Australian wine industry. Robert sold his beloved property and winery in 2007 but remains a welcome friend and advisor to the new Crabtree Crew.
 Crabtree

The Crabtree site has been planted to vineyards for well over 100 years, with the first vines being planted in the 1880s, though none of these original plantings exist. Adolf Glaetzer and his sons were largely responsible for the planting of the vineyards as they are today, with the remainder being largely Robert Crabtree’s more recent plantings of Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, and a little more Riesling. Although the original plantings have long since gone, most of the current vineyards are still quite mature, including 60+ year old Grenache, 50+ year old Shiraz, and 30+ year old Riesling vines.

The winery is quite small overall, and is very much a boutique operation so far as production is concerned. The greater part of the production, as for many of the Clare Valley wineries, revolves around Riesling, with this variety accounting for approximately 50% of overall production. Second in production volume is Shiraz, and then Cabernet Sauvignon, with smaller amounts of Tempranillo, Grenache, and Semillon.

Traditional rod and spur hand pruning is used on all vineyards, and all grapes are handpicked. All fruit is estate grown for the dry white and dry red wines, with a very small percentage of high quality Muscat grapes from the Smith family in the North of Clare (from 140 year old vines) added to complement the estate's own Muscat of Alexandria supply to make sweeter Muscat and Zibibbo wines. Vines are very low yielding and are essentially dry grown, although most of the vineyards do have drip irrigation lines to ensure the vines do not suffer from too much water stress.

The house that makes up the cellar door dates back to when the Clare Valley was first settled, and has been the home of a number of local identities over the years. Robert Crabtree resided here while making wine on the estate. Adolf Glaetzer was one of these residents, known best in the Clare Valley for his fresh fruit and vegetables rather than winemaking, though his descendants have made the Glaetzer name synonymous with Australian winemaking. Robert Crabtree purchased the house from the Glaetzer family, it is heritage listed, the oldest sections date back to 1849.

The estate is home to a family of very inquisitive alpacas, which apart from being pets, also keep the grass at bay around the winery. José, the older male Alpaca, has the handy habit of being very protective of his family of females and keeps the sheep safe. The alpacas and sheep love nothing more than eating freshly crushed grape skins and stems during vintage, and will crowd around the winery when they see grapes on the tractor hoping to get a feed, which they usually do. Free roaming geese, an increasing number of ducks, chickens, cats, and some lorikeets, all of which can be seen wandering around the house (except for the Lorikeets of course), and some of which occasionally join in the cellar door for visitors wine tasting. Sales of alpaca wool or chicken and duck eggs through the cellar door go directly to improving education at a school in Africa that the winery sponsors.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services