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From New Zealand's
Central Otago
$2499each
$299DOZEN
Amisfield Sauvignon Blanc
Light straw colour. Aromas of limes and passionfruit complimented by a mixture of tropical stone fruit. The palate is full bodied and dry with considerable fruit weight and layering. Rife with tropical meets vegetal complexity, the palate is full bodied and dry with great intensity of fruit balanced by refreshing acidity.
 
Ruinart R De Ruinart Brut
$12499each
$1499DOZEN
 
Blackwood Ridge Shiraz 2008
A stylish high country Shiraz
$1799each
$215DOZEN
From Fruit Grown To The Envigorating Cool Climes Of Strathbogie Ranges Plunkett Fowles retain many of Victoria's most splendid high altitude vineyards the long cool ripening seasons yield harvests of the most intensely flavoured grapes with exciting milled spice characters and refined, velvet tannins. A choice component is treated to a term of age in a curious collection of large, highly precious 500 litre English oak casks which are over a hundred years of age.
$2149each
$257DOZEN
Villa Maria Private Bin Pinot Gris VILLA MARIA POSSESS THE MAGIC TOUCH WITH PINOT GRIS, regularly clearing international wine events of prestigious trophies. Private Bin has been included in the Decanter Top 50 Best Under £10 and identified as a Decanter favourite. Villa Maria retain the finest vineyards throughout New Zealand's grand expansive viticultural precincts, affording the team every opportunity to collate harvests at the zenith of flavour development. Exciting characters of lychee and pinenut, apples and melon, a crisp and racy acidity. Meet your Maria at a Trattoria, for an evening of gaiety, gorgonzola and Gris.
$4599each
$551DOZEN
Cloudy Bay Pinot Noir PINOT NOIR THRIVES THROUGHOUT THE FAVOURABLE PRECINCTS OF MARLBOROUGH, where Cloudy Bay have planted the best clones on the choicest sites, to realize harvests of the finest fruit. Crop levels are carefully controlled to ensure the grapes are brimming wth great concentration of flavour, selectively picked and treated to a regimen of old fashioned, tried and true, minimalist vinification techniques. Cloudy Bay are always richly layered with complexity, fruit driven yet exquisitely dry, finely structured and supported by ripe, licorice textured tannins.
$7499each
$899DOZEN
Felton Road Pinot Noir A CHARACTERFUL PINOT NOIR BORN OF TRIUMPH OVER ADVERSITY. Considerable research by Stewart Elms in 1991 identified the north facing slopes at the end of Felton Road near Bannockburn as being one of the warmest and most ideal sites in Central Otago. Heat summation data and soil maps from the construction of the Clyde Hydro Dam made a crucial contribution to the establishment of vines on Felton Road. Mouthcoating, subtle and caressing of fruit, a Pinot Noir of harmony, restraint and sophistication that intrigues rather than shouts its breeding, finishing with just enough tannin to frame the wine beautifully.
$2749each
$329DOZEN
Coriole Estate Shiraz CORIOLE IS ONE OF MCLAREN VALE'S MOST EMINENT, artisanal estates. Consecutive vintages of Coriole Shiraz have claimed a remarkable back to back San Francisco Double Gold. Exclusively estate grown, the majority of vines are some forty years of age. Coriole know from Shiraz, having grown the varietal since 1919 and rating Langtons Classification for the estate flagship Lloyd Reserve. Coriole is sylistically strong, showing exceptional concentration of flavour, elegantly lined by gentle tannins and supported by judicious oak.
Robert Crabtree studied
law at Oxford University and was a practising lawyer/ academic at Cambridge, he always had an interest in viticulture and made fruit wines as a hobby
Crabtree's curiosity in winemaking led him to complete two vintages at Bergerac and another in New Zealand, before landing in Australia and deciding that he would become a full time winemaker. After careful selection of possible wine regions, Robert decided that the Clare Valley was to be the region of choice. Whilst studying winemaking at Roseworthy, Robert purchased a small existing property at Watervale in 1980 and named it Watervale Cellars. In 1983 Robert purchased the old Flax Mill building in Auburn. He equipped it as a small (somewhat rough and ready) winery and planted two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The business became known as Crabtree’s Watervale Cellars for a number of years. Robert built an enviable reputation for fine classic Watervale wines over the following 27 years and became a passionate advocate for the Clare Valley and South Australian wine industry. Robert sold his beloved property and winery in 2007 but remains a welcome friend and advisor to the new Crabtree Crew.
 Crabtree

The Crabtree site has been planted to vineyards for well over 100 years, with the first vines being planted in the 1880s, though none of these original plantings exist. Adolf Glaetzer and his sons were largely responsible for the planting of the vineyards as they are today, with the remainder being largely Robert Crabtree’s more recent plantings of Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, and a little more Riesling. Although the original plantings have long since gone, most of the current vineyards are still quite mature, including 60+ year old Grenache, 50+ year old Shiraz, and 30+ year old Riesling vines.

The winery is quite small overall, and is very much a boutique operation so far as production is concerned. The greater part of the production, as for many of the Clare Valley wineries, revolves around Riesling, with this variety accounting for approximately 50% of overall production. Second in production volume is Shiraz, and then Cabernet Sauvignon, with smaller amounts of Tempranillo, Grenache, and Semillon.

Traditional rod and spur hand pruning is used on all vineyards, and all grapes are handpicked. All fruit is estate grown for the dry white and dry red wines, with a very small percentage of high quality Muscat grapes from the Smith family in the North of Clare (from 140 year old vines) added to complement the estate's own Muscat of Alexandria supply to make sweeter Muscat and Zibibbo wines. Vines are very low yielding and are essentially dry grown, although most of the vineyards do have drip irrigation lines to ensure the vines do not suffer from too much water stress.

The house that makes up the cellar door dates back to when the Clare Valley was first settled, and has been the home of a number of local identities over the years. Robert Crabtree resided here while making wine on the estate. Adolf Glaetzer was one of these residents, known best in the Clare Valley for his fresh fruit and vegetables rather than winemaking, though his descendants have made the Glaetzer name synonymous with Australian winemaking. Robert Crabtree purchased the house from the Glaetzer family, it is heritage listed, the oldest sections date back to 1849.

The estate is home to a family of very inquisitive alpacas, which apart from being pets, also keep the grass at bay around the winery. José, the older male Alpaca, has the handy habit of being very protective of his family of females and keeps the sheep safe. The alpacas and sheep love nothing more than eating freshly crushed grape skins and stems during vintage, and will crowd around the winery when they see grapes on the tractor hoping to get a feed, which they usually do. Free roaming geese, an increasing number of ducks, chickens, cats, and some lorikeets, all of which can be seen wandering around the house (except for the Lorikeets of course), and some of which occasionally join in the cellar door for visitors wine tasting. Sales of alpaca wool or chicken and duck eggs through the cellar door go directly to improving education at a school in Africa that the winery sponsors.

Johann Gottlob Schrapel
and his family arrived in South Australia from Silesia on the ship George Washington in 1844, just eight years after the colony was settled
Like many of their fellow Germanic migrants they made their way by ox cart to Bethany, the Barossa Valley’s first settlement, where they established a home and cleared the land to grow crops and graze animals. The Schrapels planted their first vineyard in 1852 from cuttings carefully nursed from Europe. A wine cellar was also built, but despite Johann’s reputation as an early colonial winemaker, the family concentrated on grape growing rather than winemaking for the next four generations. More than a century later in 1981, Johann’s fifth generation descendants, brothers Geoff and Robert Schrapel, established Bethany Wines in a quarry, where the pioneers had hewn stone for their homes, high in the Barossa Ranges overlooking the family’s vineyards and the historic village of Bethany.
 Bethany

The early 1980s were tough times for Barossa grapegrowers. A red wine boom was followed by a glut and, as grape prices fell below production cost, the State Government encouraged growers to pull out their old Shiraz and Grenache vines. Instead, the Schrapels chose to establish a tradition of winemaking from this undervalued yet irreplaceable resource of old vineyards. Gradually their reputation grew.

Now a vibrant family wine company, Bethany Wines employs many people and plays a significant role in the Barossa community. Geoff and Robert’s vision was to create a Barossa wine experience and in doing so, improve the quality of life for their customers, friends and family. In this they have succeeded. Their aim is to live well, provide for their children, care for the land and hand the winery and vineyards to the next generation in a better position than when they started.

The family's historic vineyards are the key to production of theiquality wines. Thirty hectares of vineyard in Bethany are owned by the Schrapels, comprising the Bethanien Block, the Old Manse Block and the Homestead Block. A range of varieties are grown from Chardonnay, Riesling and Semillon to Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Grenache. The age of their vines ranges from 15 to 80 years. The old vines require traditional management of hand pruning and harvesting, while the newer plantings are managed with modern viticultural techniques such as close planting, high trellises and canopy control.

Geoff and Robert look for maximum expression of fruit flavour in their wines and pay particular attention to the careful handling of grapes at vintage. The use of chemicals is minimised in grape growing and wine is made in small lots to maximise variations in fruit flavour and ripeness which contribute complexity to the wines; wines which are the most natural expression of their unique Barossa terroir.

During the last two decades Bethany Wines has won acclaim at Australian and international wine shows and consumer tastings for its hand-made, fruit driven wines. The greatest natural advantage the Schrapels have is the fruit which comes from the family's carefully tended vineyards. Their thirty hectares of vineyard in Bethany, comprising the Bethanien Block, the Old Manse block and the Homestead Block are fanned during summer evenings with cooling gully breezes, creating a special microclimate which allows the grapes to achieve good sugar and acid levels without becoming over-ripe. It takes a long time to know a vineyard. At Bethany these vines can live for four or five generations. The special understanding of how to grow grapes on the unique Bethany clay soils has taken many years for the Schrapel descendants to master.

Amisfield Wines are
producers of Central Otago Pinot Noir, aromatic whites and superlative Methode Traditionelle
Amisfield Vineyard is located 7km north of Lowburn near the shores of Lake Dunstan in Central Otago, New Zealand. Originally a high country merino stud nestled between Amisfield and Parkburn streams, planting commenced in 1999, and now consists of 60 hectares of Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc. The vines are close planted on a range of alluvial and glacial schist soils imparting balance in the vines growth and productivity.
 Amisfield

Yields are kept low to provide concentrated fruit flavour with complexity derived from the range of sites within the vineyard. High altitude, cool climate, long summers, and clean soils allow Amisfield to produce some of the best Pinot Noirs and aromatic white wines in New Zealand. The superb Central Otago environment combined with the passion of the winemaking team is the secret behind high quality wines.

A new state-of-the-art-wine production facility was completed in March 2006 in time to process 400 tonnes of grapes in its first season. The purpose built facility at the Lowburn vineyard has a 600 tonne capacity and centres round a cuverie for Pinot Noir production.

The two level rustic agricultural style complex incorporates leading technology and further stages are planned to cater for increased production and eventually a packaging plant. Two high-tech wine presses have been installed, the same model used in the majority of vineyards in Burgundy in France.

A custom built recycled waste plant which is the first of its kind used on a New Zealand vineyard means all waste from the winery is channelled through aquatic plants established in a wetland area. All Winery waste is recycled and this reflects our commitment to sustainability.

The overriding winemaking philosophy revolves around the fact that quality wine is grown not made. A blend of ancient and modern winemaking techniques ensures the wines are true to their site, climate, cultivar and culture. Winemaking techniques reflect this in harvest, fermentation and ageing, again utilising natural processes to reflect site differences between individual sites within the farm. The vineyard team's approach to viticulture embraces sustainable agricultural practices where management inputs work with nature rather than against. As such the winemaking approach at Amisfield is one of minimal impact on the extraordinary fruit produced from season to season making the wines a natural expression of the land from which they are created.

The Angove family
company is one of Australia's largest privately owned wine companies and stands as one of the few with strong interests in distilling as well as grape growing and winemaking
The origins of Angove's as a company have more to do with satisfying a way of life rather than a determination to establish a wine and brandy producing business. Dr. William Angove, an accomplished general practitioner and surgeon with his wife and young family, emigrated from Cornwall in 1886 to establish a medical practice in South Australia. His early experimentation with vines, winemaking and distilling, led to the establishment of a proud family business. Dr. Angove's initial plantings at the township of Tea Tree Gully in the Adelaide foothills were the forerunner of one of the largest vineyards in the southern hemisphere - the magnificent Nanya Vineyard at Renmark in South Australia's Riverland.
 Angoves

Early vintages of wine, a Burgundy styled dry red, from the original Tea Tree Gully vineyard proved to be popular with the local community. Steady expansion of the vineyard and the building of a winery and cellars of local stone meant that, by the turn of the century, production reached 300 tonnes of grapes from some 50 acres of land under vines. During that period the accent on red wine was gradually supplemented by the production of dry white wines as well as wines in the sherry and port styles.

Stills and a large steam boiler were installed for production of fortifying spirit by Angove's eldest son, Thomas Skipper Angove, who while completing studies in Oenolegy at Roseworthy College, branched out from the family home in Tea Tree Gully and set up a distillery and processing house at Renmark in South Australia's Riverland region in 1910.

Angove's enjoys wide respect for the ability to distil high quality brandy

Despite the disruptions of two wars, growth of the Renmark operation progressed as well as developing a fine reputation for table and fortified wines. The renowned St. Agnes had become a hallmark for quality brandy in Australia and a number of export markets. Since World War II, the company has steadily expanded its operations and structure. The Renmark facility has grown to become a major winemaking and distilling entity with storage capacity for more than 15 million litres of wine and spirit. In 1947, Thomas William Carlyon Angove, grandson of the founder, took the helm as Managing Director, beginning a new era in development.

Progressively, equipment, crushing facilities, modern winemaking plant and cooling systems have been renewed and added, enabling the company to develop methods in premium red and white table wine production. In 1983, the fourth generation of the family took control, when John Carlyon Angove succeeded his father as Managing Director of the company.

John has taken up where his father left off, with increased development and investment in all aspects of the winery. From redevelopment of Nanya Vineyard to increased storage capacity and a state of the art packaging facility, all housed on the Angove Estate at Renmark. A renewed focus towards sales and marketing has seen the development of an Australian based sales force servicing the domestic trade, and expansion of Angove's export activities to the point where Angove's wines can be found in over 30 different countries around the globe.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 57706940

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services