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Mount Pleasant Elizabeth Semillon Cellar Release
Hunter Valley Semillon is one of Australia's great contributions to the world of wine
$3099each
$371DOZEN
The Grapes At Harvest Are Characterised By An Ideal PH And Perfect Acidity The completed wines exhibit handsome colour and a bright bouquet before a superb palate with excellent depth and great length of flavour Every year, a limited quantity of Elizabeth Semillon is reserved for extended ageing in perfect conditions under the McWilliam cellars. Upon release the wine shows all the classic characters of Hunter Valley Semillon, beautiful honey flavours and golden toastyness.
From New Zealand's
Gisborne Hawkes Marlborough
$2149each
$257DOZEN
Villa Maria Private Bin Chardonnay
Pale straw hues. Ripe tropical fruits, peach and kernel aromas dominate the bouquet, pear notes with underlying citrus and fig characters. A big palate of stonefruit flavours, crisp apple notes and creamy, mealy textures are supported by well integrated nougat oak. A medium bodied wine that's generous on the bouquet yet soft on the palate, styled for immediate enjoyment right now.
Excellent Langtons Classification
St Hugo Cabernet Sauvignon 2012
$3499each
$419DOZEN
NAMED FOR THE CONTRIBUTION OF JOHANN GRAMP'S GRANDSON TO THE ORLANDO WINE COMPANY. St Hugo is the very best varietal Cabernet Sauvignon of vintage. Hugo is vintaged entirely from fruit grown to the famed cigar shape of Coonawarra Terra rossa. one of the world's great Cabernet appellations. The team regularly visit the vineyards monitoring development of grapes. Selection is the key to delivering the finest possible St Hugo. only the standout parcels of Coonawarra Cabernet are earmarked for inclusion. .
$1549each
$185DOZEN
Tscharke Girl Talk Savagnin DAMIEN TSCHARKE, proprietor, grower and winemaker is a sixth generation vigneron and Roseworthy baccalaureate who graduated with honours in viticulture. Girl Talk Savagnin is vinified from Albarino, an Iberian varietal that's native to the cool, windswept corner of northwest Portugal and Spain. Thick skinned, naturally acidic and an early ripening aromatic style, Damien Tscharke was convinced it would perform well at in the soils of Marananga. Girl Talk Albarino makes the perfect conversation starter, as well as being a deeply engaging food wine.
$1699each
$203DOZEN
Wolf Blass Verae  2009 VERAE IS THE DELICIOUS LIGHT BODIED RED THAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT. Fashioned from Shiraz and Riesling grapes grown to good vineyards on the Limestone Coast. Serve it straight from the ice bucket as a pre-dinner drink, or take it right through a meal from entree to dessert. It's light enough for a summer's day, but with the depth and complexity of flavour to take you into the night. Verae combines luscious red berry flavours with tangy citrus characters. Delicately spritzed, irresistible when chilled, to be enjoyed at every possible occasion.
$2999each
$359DOZEN
Starvedog Lane Chardonnay 2008 WHAT CONSTITUTED A LANE, I suppose, was a large encampment of German emigrants who had pitched their tents in a parallel line on the opposite side of the row. They were recent arrivals from Germany by the ships Zebra and Prince George, and were the pioneers and founders of the little rural hamlet of Hahndorf.
$1749each
$209DOZEN
Maxwell Little Demon Shiraz Grenache IN 1871 SCOTTISH SCIENTIST JAMES CLERK MAXWELL PROPOSED A THOUGHT EXPERIMENT WHICH INVOLVED A HYPOTHETICAL CREATURE KNOWN TO PHYSICISTS AS MAXWELL'S LITTLE DEMON, it has stirred debate in the science community ever since. Maxwell of Mclaren Vale have built a solid reputation for hand made, rich and robust red wines that combine exquisite fruit with solid structure and finesse. Little Demon offers the delightful perfumed lift of Viognier before a rich and effusive fruit filled Shiraz Grenache palate, absolutely exquisite, even in its youth.
Kaesler - a
century of tradition based around the Old Vines, nurtured and handled by some of the most caring hands in the Barossa
The Kaesler Vineyards were established in 1893. The family, sprung from Silesian pioneers who came to the Barossa Valley in the 1840s, took up 96 acres in 1891. They cleared the scrub and in 1893 planted out the entire holding with Shiraz, Grenache, Mataro (Mourvedre) and White Hermitage vines.
 Kaesler

Some of the gnarled dry-grown Shiraz vines still remain and provide the backbone for the intense wines produced from the sandy loams of this prime viticultural block. In the early sixties, Arthur Kaesler saw no future in dried fruit, and pulled out the fruit trees to replace them with vines, mostly Shiraz and Grenache, still mainly for port. He also planted Mataro, just to have something different, Clare Riesling (Crouchen) and some Semillon.

The Kaeslers did not make their own wine. Traditionally, they sold their grapes to the Seppelts. The exceptional Kaesler wines now being produced had their beginning in 1997 when a young winemaker at Cellarmaster just a few hundred metres away at Dorrien noticed the power and intensity of the fruit. The old vine material was there. Led by 3.7 acres of 1893 Shiraz, more than 70% of the red vines in the vicinity of the vineyard were 40 or more years old. The Shiraz thrived on the sandy loam over clay. The Grenache was on the rockier patches, restricting the crop from this prolific producer.

Today's Kaesler Wines springs from a worldwide search for a property to produce the best possible grapes for red wine. Winemaker Reid Bosward and his co-owners, a group of international wine lovers, searched areas such as the Napa Valley, the south of France, Marlborough, and other parts of Australia before deciding on the Barossa. "No other area can produce the intensity of flavor that we have in the Barossa," says Reid.

The first site that the winelovers acquired comprised 26.3 acres of vines, eight acres of Shiraz, 5-1/2 acres of Grenache, 2-1/2 acres of Mataro, eight acres of Semillon and just over two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The inaugural 2000 vintage was difficult throughout the valley. Kaesler made a crush of 19.6 tonnes off the twenty six acres, but it was good stuff. In 2001, they added the crop from the newly acquired neighbouring 28.5 acres, six acres of Shiraz, eight acres of Grenache, six of Semillon, some Riesling, and some fresh plantings of Voignier. This was a variety that Reid had experience with in France as a straight white wine, and as a fascinating blend with Shiraz. The first major decision was to intensify the fruit even further. Growers who send their fruit to outside wineries may tend to keep their tonnages up. Growers who make their own wine can opt to restrict the output to increase the quality. By pruning responsibly and reducing water, Reid has already cut the yield on red wine grapes by nearly 40%. The result is density and exquisite flavour. Baume, the measure of sugar content, is high - allowing wine to be made with up to 15% alcohol.

Why make such powerful wines? "Because we can," Reid explains. "Lean wines are for a lean area. The Barossa allows us to have a high intensity of flavour. Most other places can't do this."

Paxton Vineyards Pty
Ltd is one of South Australia's leading producers of quality fruit for the wine industry
David Paxton has been growing grapes in McLaren Vale for almost 30 years. In this time he has developed and managed vineyards in the Adelaide Hills, Coonawarra, Yarra Valley, regions of Western Australia and has consulted to growers across the country. David's company Paxton Vineyards owns approximately 200 acres of premium McLaren Vale vineyards and manages over 500 acres in the region as well as over 25 on Kangaroo Island. Whilst the majority of the grapes grown by Paxton are sold to wine companies, a small portion is utilised for the Paxton label.
 Paxton

For decades Paxton have nurtured their vineyards in the McLaren Vale. During this time the philosophy and reputation has been built on growing grapes of exceptional quality. The Paxton mission now is to showcase quality, varietal expression and natural regional diversity within a range of wines that will indulge lovers of the finest drop. It's been heads down, tails up for everyone at Paxton, for as long as they can remember.

In Paxton's home of McLaren Vale South Australia, their vineyards are spread across a number of sites and soil types which are managed without compromise from planting to harvest. The Paxton winemaker's mission is to produce and showcase the region's fruit quality, varietal expression and natural diversity, particularly with Shiraz, which is now well recognised as the region's top performing variety.

Paxton call the approach back to the future

It involves combining traditional, hands-on management, integrated and complimented with modern technology. The Paxton winemakers choose to propagate vines from old pre-clonal selection vineyards to benefit from stock with a history of low-yield and high quality. The vineyard site characteristics that the Paxton winemaking team target have soil profiles that allow perfect control of soil moisture content via irrigation, maximising fruit quality and intensity.

Here the winemakers work with the concept of terroir, although they make nothing of the mystery that is often attached to the word. It can be complex but it is not magic. Paxton considers terroir as the interaction between a vine, its environment and the impact of man's management with the moisture balance of the soil being possibly the major influence. Management techniques are varied to suit variety and style.

The Paxton name is known within the Australian wine industry for growing and supplying grapes to wineries, and only a small portion is utilised for the Paxton label. Utilisation of techniques such as shoot thinning, leaf plucking and fruit thinning are employed to attain superior quality. Targeted crop levels for Shiraz are 6 - 8 Tonnes per hectare.

The historic Sandalford
Wines is located in the heart of the Swan Valley on the banks of the beautiful Swan River, a short 25- minutes drive from the city of Perth
Western Australia's first Surveyor General, John Septimus Roe founded the 40 hectare Estate in 1840, which now includes 22 hectares under vine as well as housing the Winery, hospitality and tourism facilities and administration. He named the property Sandalford after the priory in Berkshire where his father was rector. The Estate formed part of the second land title in all of Western Australia. Today's Sandalford, located on the original property, is one of Western Australia's oldest and largest privately owned wineries.
 Sandalford

Sandalford Wines is unquestionably WA's leading Wine Tourism facility, recognised by multiple awards for the commitment to wine tourism. Sandalford's tourism hospitality facilities extend to the Margaret River Estate, set amongst beautiful garden setting and south-west bushland. This estate boasts a charming, rustic, rammed earth cellar, free picnic and BBQ facilities and of course, purchasing and sampling Sandalford's wines.

Sandalford hosts a range of indoor and outdoor events, from the popular wine maker's dinner to the pinnacle event, the Symphony at Sandalford. The annual Symphony at Sandalford boasts world class entertainment, showcasing major international acts teamed together with orchestral backing. Outdoor concerts exemplify the powerful combination of food, wine and music in the picturesque surroundings of one of the states oldest wineries.

In 1972 Sandalford developed a major vineyard in Margaret River. This coastal region in Western Australia's south-west is a premium Australian grape growing area and the Margaret River vineyard is Sandalford's largest source of grapes. This vineyard is now not only one of the oldest, but also one the largest, covering 600 acres. Sandalford's award-winning wines reflect contemporary wine making and include a Premium Collection and the popular Element Range. Recent modernisation increased Sandalford's capacity to almost one million litres in French and American Oak barrels and 600 square metres of underground storage. These state-of-the-art facilities permit custom requests of maturation stock.

After a brief period of overseas ownership, proprietors Peter and Debra Prendiville acquired the operation in 1991. An enthusiastic team of professionals are now actively managing an ongoing multi-million dollar redevelopment of both the winery and the vineyard. Under their guidance, Sandalford produces exceptional quality premium wines, available in more than 35 countries around the world and offers visitors to it's Swan Valley winery a world class wine tourism, hospitality and education facility.

Sandalford has made wines for over 150 years, changing their style and vinification in many ways. Winemaking however has been around for thousands of years so in some sense little has changed. Sandalford is Western Australia's first winery to utilise an artificial wetland concept for the treatment of all winery liquid waste. After treatment, the quality of this resource is such that it is used to irrigate the gardens and lawn areas which surround the winery environs. The system is licensed by the Department of Environmental Protection - Waters and Rivers Commission. Today the winery oversees two prestigious vineyards, one in the famed Wilyabrup region of Margaret River and the other in the Swan Valley. Nothing makes as much sense as aspiring to produce outstanding wine, achieving this goal must then be a source of enormous satisfaction. The wine making team at Sandalford should then be well satisfied with the unrelenting lineage of impressive releases.

Rahona Valley Wines
is nestled within the elevated aspects of Red Hill which overlooks Mount Martha and Port Phillip Bay in the west, Point Leo and Westernport Bay to the east
The estate's wines are all produced from a single four acre vineyard in a small valley at Red Hill on the Mornington Peninsula. The conditions are excellent, deep, well drained red basalt soils nurture the vines, as the cool maritime climes lead to a long, slow ripening period. Starting from scratch in 1991, the north facing 1.6 hectare vineyard surrounded by bushland now has 5000 hand tended vines of mostly Pinot Noir with a small block of Pinot Meunier. Here at Rahona Valley, the vines are mature and the drinkers are noticing the difference. All vines are own rooted, so provided there are a couple more generations of dedicated vignerons and winemakers, characteristics should compare with Burgundy. Rahona Valley's best wines are aged in the barrel for 18 months or more, whereas the normal process is to bottle after 12 months so that barrels can be reused for the next harvest.
 Rahona Valley

Oak barrels impart a very important part of the flavour profile to wine and are also one of the most significant costs each year. The annual visit of the cooper to Rahona Valley is therefore one of those pivotal occasions that that will go a long way to setting the style of the vintage and it usually happens around 6 months before harvest. Selection of the timber is only the first step, next is the seasoning, two or three years? And where? Australia or France? Then there is the level of toast. This refers to the heat of the fires that are burned inside the barrel to make the staves bend, light medium or heavy. With so many variables, not to mention the fruit and the season it is very difficult to truly understand the impact of each different selection.

Pinot being a lighter style of wine is generally better suited to a tight grained timber so that the exchange of flavours is more subtle. Typically, oak from the Allier region of central France where a combination of lower rainfall and soil fertility slows growth giving that tighter grain. Within the Allier region the forest of Troncais seems to produce particularly good timber and is the most highly priced of all.

Cool climates can be both blessing and bane for viticulture. Even on the Mornington Peninsula there can be substantial losses. Commonly vineyards in frost prone areas have defensive measures such as windmills, helicopters, water sprays or frost pots cans filled with sump oil and other wastes that are burned to provide a smoke blanket that prevents heat loss by radiation. To affect a vine the shoots must be chilled to -2ºC or less. This is quite a severe frost, particularly to be that cold at cordon height, approximately 1 metre above the ground. If there is a lot of dew around the effect can be mitigated by the formation of ice crystals on the shoots which limits the cooling. This is why severe frost events are often associated with droughts because the atmosphere is too dry to form ice crystals.

In the cool climate areas of Australia and particularly at Rahona Valley, the components of the north facing site are expolited to allow maximum exposure to the sun, well-drained ancient basalt soil and an open canopy, to deliver beautiful disease free ripe fruit. Minimal wine making techniques and a restrained use of new oak allow this fruit to develop into an elegant wine with complex fruit flavours and well balanced tannin and acidity. As the Burgundians say, it's all in the fruit. The wine makes itself.

"You can tell straight away that these wines are all about the fruit. It literally sings with a story of where it came from. One minute I was in Mornington Peninsula, the next I was sipping Gevrey Chambartin in an underground cellar in the Cote de Nuits. They say great Pinot Noir is like an iron fist in a velvet glove, so strap on these mits. Such depth of fruit, lingering around in the mouth for eternity. Earth, savoury fruits, truffle, game meats and that’s just the nose. It is a wine that there is just not enough to go around. When you start talking barrels of a particular wine that tastes like a top Burgundy, grab it and don’t tell anyone else where you got it. Pinot Meunier adds weight and a fleshiness of fruit to Chardonnay and Pinot Noir in the blend for our favourite bubbly. As a stand alone wine, it is a real gem and with only 3 rows of vines contributing to the production, 1 to 2 barrels does not go a long way. Sweet dark brambly fruit with power and finesse to boot!" -Wine Satiety

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 57706940

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services