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Penfolds Bin 389 2003
Offering compelling virtuosity in terms of pure drinkability and potential for cellaring
$11999each
$1439DOZEN
Bin 389 Remains One Of The Stalwarts Of The Secondary Wine Market The many vintages throughout it's distinguished history are eagerly sought by collectors The continuity of magnificence in styling has remained unaffected by the development of viticulture and expansion of production. Still harmonious, ever seamless in it's expression of fruit and wood, vintage and winecraft, impeccably balanced between the Cabernet and Shiraz, it remains an approachable icon wine.
 
Kooyong Ferrous Pinot Noir
Planted exclusively to Pinot Noir
$6299each
$755DOZEN
Kooyong Estate's Ferrous Vineyard Lies Atop Sandstones Which Are Encrusted With Iron Oxide Giving them a rusty appearance and inspiring the Ferrous moniker Unique soils impart the intriguing characters of hot wet stone and rusty outback to the exquisitely compex nose. The scant 1.74 hectares of Ferrous Block yield an extremely limited release, single vineyard wine, arguably Mornington's flagship Pinot Noir.
 
Tahbilk Old Vines Cabernet Shiraz
Tahbilk have the magic touch with old vines
$4099each
$491DOZEN
Custodians Of A Priceless Prephylloxera Block Established In 1860 And Productive To This Day Sourced from parcels averaging thirty to forty years of age Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz are treated to a traditional old world style of open ferments in an ancient collection of 150 year old oak vats, followed by extended maturation in a mix of the finest French and American oak. The perfect accompaniement to seared rib, kipflers and red wine jus.
$2299each
$275DOZEN
Konrad Organic Sauvignon Blanc KONRAD HENGSTLER DISCOVERED MARLBOROUGH WHILE TRAVELING THROUGH NEW ZEALAND IN 1987 AND WAS IMMEDIATELY ATTRACTED TO SAUVIGNON BLANC. Today Konrad excels at everything Sauvignon Blanc and loves everything Marlborough, his estate wineworks are located in Waihopai Valley at the very heart of Marlborough, it enjoys magnificent views of the surrounding mountain ranges. The terroir and microclimes here yield a tremendous quality of Sauvignon Blanc, fruit which ripens to perfection, translating into wines of intense regional character.
$1999each
$239DOZEN
Villa Puccini Sangiovese Merlot Toscana IGT VILLA PUCCINI IS CRAFTED TO EMBODY THE TRADITIONS AND ENDURING SPIRIT OF TUSCANY. The bold flavours of Sangiovese have been beautifully integrated with the supple nature of Merlot, the final wine is an easy to enjoy dry red that offers many of the rich complexities and character of the loftiest Tuscans. Only the finest Sangiovese and Merlot grapes from family owned vineyards near Suvereto, Cecina and Bolgheri are assembled. Villa Puccini recommends this medium bodied mediterranean be enjoyed young, alongside good cuisine and the company of fellow epicureans.
$2499each
$299DOZEN
Amisfield Sauvignon Blanc THERE ARE THREE BLOCKS OF SAUVIGNON BLANC AT AMISFIELD, near the shores of Lake Dunstan in Central Otago. Older vines at the edge of Rocky Knoll yield fruit with delicious ripe stone fruit characters and pronounced minerality. Younger plantings on a beautiful elevated terrace above the winery provide grapes which are brim full of vim and vigor. A combination of wild indigenous yeast vinifications, oak barrel ferments and sedimentery lees stirring, achieves a singularly vigorous and compelling case for Central Otago Sauvignon Blanc.
$1599each
$191DOZEN
Tulloch Verdelho ONE OF HUNTER VALLEY'S GREAT WINEMAKING ESTATES, home to the nation's best known Verdelho. Originating from Portugal, traditionally used to make fortified wines such as Madeira, Verdelho has always enjoyed popularity in Australia, the Hunter Valley examples in particular are a class of their own. Tulloch sources the best grapes from good vineyards on the fertile river plains of Upper Hunter, to be assembled alongside smaller parcels from the Tulloch property at Pokolbin. A course of barrel ferments and oak treatments add a measure of richness and complexity.
Hay Shed Hill
is a classic old vineyard in the heart of the Willyabrup Valley, where the region’s first vines were planted and the great tradition of Margaret River wine began
The Hay Shed Hill property was a group settlement farm for returned soldiers from the 1st World War and was originally established as a diary farm. The current homestead, considerably renovated, still has much of the original Group Settlement look and feel. Vines were first planted in 1973 to the varieties which have put Margaret River on the wine map; Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc. The property was known as Sussex Vale until 1989 when it was bought by Barry & Liz Morrison. The Morrison’s were instrumental in establishing what you see today, managing to turn a fairly run down farm with a few vines into a quality grape producer with nearly 18 ha of vines. The place was planted right, the right varieties on the right slopes with the right soils. The winemakers today enjoy the advantage of working with truly mature vines.
 Hay Shed Hill

As the old hay shed from the dairy days was a local landmark, the Morrison’s used this to create the new name for the property, Hay Shed Hill. Tools found in the hay shed provided them with the inspiration for Hay Shed’s sister label – Pitchfork Wines. In 1992 the winery was redesigned by a local architect to complement the existing house and hay shed. The effect is a visually stunning structure, which complements the existing buildings and is both striking and charming when viewed upon approach to the winery.

The Morrison’s owned the property for 11 years until 2000 when they sold to a wine investment group based in New South Wales. In 2002 the property and business was sold to Australian Wine Holdings Limited. The current winemakers bought back the farm in late 2006 and began the revival of this great vineyard and wine brand commencing with major vineyard investment and the re-design and renewal of the wine branding and labels.

Michael Kerrigan, formally the Chief Winemaker of Howard Park and MadFish Wines for the previous 12 years and a small group of partners took over the Hay Shed Hill vineyard and brands just before Christmas 2006. He was familiar with the Hay Shed Hill vineyard and its potential. He could not pass up an opportunity to be part of such an exciting winery that is producing Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon wines as good as or better than any wine producer in Margaret River – and that means world class wine.

Hay Shed Hill vineyard has the mission of producing world class wines that reflect the place of their origin; wines of depth and flavour that are true to region and true to the vineyard. Small, old, hands-on vineyards and wineries like Hay Shed Hill need to be owned and run by winemakers and grape growers; people who are attached to the land and the place and wish to express its character through the wine. In the end corporations shouldn’t run boutique wine businesses.

What makes a good vineyard? If you want to make good wine you need to start with good fruit from a good vineyard. Winemakers have bought back the farm. A good vineyard has all the attributes of regional climate, in Hay Shed Hill's case the kind maritime conditions of the southwest Cape of Western Australia with its mild temperatures and dry summers – remarkably similar to the conditions of Bordeaux. Good soil, well drained gravelly loams. But most important are the individual site characteristics which have a major influence on the weather and local climate experienced by the vines. The Hay Shed Hill site is hilly with wonderful north facing slopes giving maximum sun light to the Cabernet Sauvignon and south facing slopes reducing the heat load on the Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The property is an outstanding site combining the attributes of fully mature vines with distinctive soil type and the mild weather conditions of the area to produce some of the best fruit from the region. The right varieties planted to the right slopes.

The fortuitous Soumah
vines were established along Hexham Road, very near the auspicious Yarra Valley hamlet of Gruyere, just a short drive from the precious plantings of Yarra Yering and Coldstream Hills
Yarra Valley was the region of choice, for its acclaim in producing cool climate, clear varietal wines with savoury elegance. The Soumah raison d’etre is to support this fame with the definitive vineyard site, nurturing viticulture and a focus on quality over quantity. The viticultural team focus on the crucible of the wine grape. Over the centuries, the noble grape varietals of the old world traveled back and forth across Europe. Viognier is a distant cousin of Nebbiolo, Savarro began its history in Bolzano but is today found in France. Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir are found in France and Italy, albeit under different styles.
 Soumah

It therefore widely regarded that the best practice is to continue to use clones, however plant a number of patches of different clones of the same variety. Planting the clones that have the history, provenance, style and flavour profile you want. This will create a more compelling and higher quality wine with more depth and a wider range of fragrance and taste profiles. This is a contributing factor why wines of the same variety, from the same region, can actually have different underlying flavours and characteristics.

Soumah take a supervised control philosophy in relation to viticulture practices. The French call it Lutte raisonnée or reasoned fight. The basis for this philosophy is to reduce the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides as these will eventually degrade the soil and make a weaker vine.

It is also about a well managed vine structure that helps reduce spray levels. Shoot thinning regimens are a practice designed to manage yield, balance crop, improve canopy structure and ventilation and reduce the need to spray.

The reduction of sprays not only contributes to the health of vines and the greater ecosystem, but also to the health of the winegrowers. Soumah have experimented to reduce herbicides by mulching the vine row, the success of this will see the continuation of mulching on a progressive basis across the entire vineyard. This has the combined benefit of reducing evaporation in the summer and promoting a softer and more sustainable soil profile. The winemaking at Soumah is all about taking a modern scientific approach to traditional farming techniques. The small team of dedicated professionals practise a regimen of holistic, environmentally sound agricultural techniques, for the realization of small yield wines which are evocative of the timeless old world classics.

One of the
higher profile Nelson wineries, Waimea Estates has grown quickly in size and stature since its first vineyards were planted in 1993
The Nelson River winegrowing region in general, and Waimea in particular, have a growing reputation for aromatic wines. The Sauvignon Blanc from Waimea has become a popular alternative to the Marlborough style, essentially classical in its gooseberry, lime and capsicum aromas, with a flinty palate adding to the wine’s appeal. From the first vintage release of a trophy winning Sauvignon Blanc in 1997, Waimea Estates has attracted attention. The Nelson region boasts high sunshine hours which provide ripe fruit flavours and cool evenings which give a fresh natural acidity to the wines. The stony loam soils of the Plains, along with a moderating maritime influence and a protective phalanx of hills, create the perfect terroir to produce a wide range of grapes. This combined with the high quality viticultural management and skilled winemaking help produce an excellent array of quality wines.
 Waimea

In 1993 the first vineyard of two hectares was planted, the Hill Vineyard. The 27 hectare Annabrook Vineyard was developed in 1993/4 and in 1995 the 8 hectare Hunter Vineyard was established. The 40 hectare Hope Block was planted in 1998. Over the winter of 2000 the eight hectare Packhouse Vineyard was planted. Colin’s Block was next in 2001, and then 2004/5 saw further plantings in both the Hunter Vineyard (now 20 hectares) plus a new location in Landsdowne Road (16 hectares). In 2006 another 20 hectares was planted in Colin’s Block. In total Waimea Estate now have over 130 hectares of vineyards. That’s a lot of vines whichever way you want to look at it!

Waimea Estate see themselves as guardian of the fruit between harvest and bottle, just as the vineyard workers see themselves as guardians of the land (the property is managed according to the principles of Sustainable Winegrowing). After extensive experience the aim has become one concentration, texture and balance in the wines. The philosophy is to create ultra-clean, ultra-pure fruit and densely textured, food-friendly wines.

The winery has certainly been innovative in its approaches to winemaking. Waimea Estate were one of the first wineries in New Zealand to use such new technologies as micro-oxygenation, Ganimede fermenters and cross-flow filtration. Modern winemaking delivers a synergy with those of the old world. This is illustrated well with the Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Both these varieties are wild yeast fermented. The Chardonnay is oxidatively handled and fermented warm with high solids. The Pinot Noir is destemmed only (not crushed), cool macerated and fermented hot with hand plunging. Extended élevage in barrel creates wines of finesse and elegance.

Waimea Estate is also known for iconic sweet wines – a Noble Riesling that has won trophies with every year of its production, an auslese-style Late Harvest Riesling and, latterly, a very interesting (and highly awarded) Noble Chardonnay. Besides the Pinot Noir, a further red is made in limited volume: a Merlot Cabernet blend with attractive mocha characters and not a hint of greenness. A delightful Pinot Rosé is also made – from high-quality Pinot Noir grapes; the wine is unusually part barrel-fermented in lightly-toasted oak, giving a strawberries and vanilla cream character.

The use of lees stirring is a distinct feature of the Waimea approach to aromatic wines – it is also used for Pinot Gris and Gewürztraminer. These last two wines have garnered significant interest due to their fruit-driven purity, their beautifully textured palates and their admirable balance and polish. Michael seeks to minimise unattractive phenolics by minimizing skin contact – the fruit is hand-harvested and whole-bunch pressed, and the juice has a very early press cut and is fermented with negligible solids. Fermentation is invariably stopped when the wine is off-dry, to bolster the palate with fruit sweetness. The only aromatic wine Michael does not use bâttonage on is the Riesling, where an approach of ‘less is more’ is taken. For the winery’s Dry Riesling clean fruit is very simply handled to focus the attention on pure fruit expression, while the slightly sweeter Classic Riesling is made more luscious through the inclusion of some botrytised fruit.

For more than
170 years Wyndham Estate has set the benchmark for quality Australian wines, proudly wearing the title of 'industry pioneer' responsible for launching Australian wines onto the world stage
English immigrant George Wyndham began this most important page in Australia's winemaking history in 1828 when he planted his first vineyard at Dalwood, along the banks of the Hunter River, in New South Wales. Seven years later Dalwood Wines, as it was then known, released its first vintage to rave reviews and by the mid-1800s was exporting to England and India.
 Wyndham

George Wyndham led the way in promoting the fledging Australian wine industry, showing Dalwood Wines in the Great Expositions of Europe and the USA. The Hunter Valley wines quickly bagged a swag of international medals and in the process earned the Australian wine industry a reputation for high standards and exceptional quality.

Wyndham Estate has continued the tradition of taking on the world with its superior winemaking and in 1988 was ranked number one at the prestigious Intervin International by winning 26 medals - a first for Australia. It did it again in 1989 and continues to impress to this day on the world stage with wines such as the 1999 Show Reserve Chardonnay winning Gold at the 2002 Chardonnay du Monde competition in France. An exclusive competition for the world's finest Chardonnays.

To honour George Wyndham's memorable achievements, Dalwood Wines was renamed Wyndham Estate in 1970 - one hundred years after George Wyndham's death

Today Wyndham Estate is renowned for much more than its wines. The original Dalwood vineyard has become a favourite tourist destination in the Hunter Valley, with its combination of fine food and entertainment to complement its popular wines. It houses a 400-seat restaurant and function facility, while the historic cellar door, open fermenters and 100-year-old operational basket press ensure guests enjoy the traditional winery experience.

Every year in the months preceding and throughout vintage the Wyndham Estate winemaking team travel over hundreds of kilometres to closely monitor a selection of premium vineyards situated in various winegrowing regions throughout South Eastern Australia. The team inspect these vineyards and taste the grapes at different stages of ripeness in order to ensure that they are harvested when the optimum flavour and acid balance is reached.

When they are not in the vineyard they can be found in the winery tasting ferments, assessing wines in barrel, evaluating wines being matured in bottle for release, or experimenting with new wine and oak combinations.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services