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Berrys Bridge Pyrenees Shiraz
The partnership of Roger Milner and Jane Holt emerged out of a juncture in mineral exploration
$3999each
$479DOZEN
Eventually Leading To Vintages At Passing Clouds And Chateau Reynella They selected a site just outside of the main nexus of Pyrenees estates to plant vines Ironically settling on the very terrain operated a century earlier by a pioneer named Berry who had also planted Shiraz.
 
Mitchelton Cuvee Blanc de Blancs Sparkling
$2399each
$287DOZEN
 
Bondar Adelaide Hills Chardonnay
$3099each
$371DOZEN
$2299each
$275DOZEN
Morris of Rutherglen Sparkling Shiraz Durif RUTHERGLEN IS POSSIBLY THE ONLY PRODUCTIVE ENCLAVE OF WORLD CLASS DURIF WINES ANYWHERE ON EARTH. It also yields a quality of Shiraz that's unique in the world of wine, by virtue of the region's phyloxera and quarantine of vines. The Morris family have been making wine at Rutherglen since 1859. Within thirty years of establishment, their flourishing operations had made Morris the largest wine producer in the southern hemisphere. Introductions aside, Morris make an effervescent red wine of remarkable intensity, profound richness and sheer class.
$2299each
$275DOZEN
Rockbare Old Vine Shiraz ROCKBARE ARE HEART, body and soul McLaren Vale. Fruit growers have been experiencing trying times of late. This has freed up some very old and precious Shiraz vineyards, which Rockbare have gleefully accepted into the fold. Tim Burvill is very gifted as a winemaker and also as a raider of isolate parcels of mature vines. He retains access to some of the Vale's best Shiraz. In the vintages since inaugural release, a number of 50+ year old vineyards have come to light, which have been assembled into an immensely satisfying experience.
$2149each
$257DOZEN
Sevenhill Inigo Merlot THE OLD VINE D3V14 CLONE PLANTED ON TWO BLOCKS AT SEVENHILL IS NOT KNOWN FOR GREAT CONCENTRATION, yet Sevenhill produces Merlot wines of greater colour, palate structure and character than most. We see Merlot's finest qualities of violet perfume and silky texture coming from the uniform but not rich, clay loams of Sevenhill's vineyard. Secondly, it's all in the timing. The aim is to encourage all berries to ripen simultaneously and evenly. A fine accompaniement to osso buco or veal, Inigo makes the most of a slow cooked leg of rosemary garlic lamb.
$2099each
$251DOZEN
Kalleske Florentine Chenin Blanc A SINGLE VINEYARD CHENIN BLANC, sourced entirely from mature vines on the Kalleske farm, wild fermented and partially barrel matured to achieve an articulately varietal yet engagingly complex wine. Florentine gets her name from Caroline Florentine Kalleske, the first daughter of Johann Georg Kalleske who migrated to Australia from Prussia in 1838. Florentine is a true hand crafted wine that's been grown, vintaged and matured on the Kalleske estate farm, near the hamlet of Greenock in northwest Barossa.
Kirrihill Wines was
established in 1999 and is located in the gently rolling hills of South Australia's famous Clare Valley wine region
Kirrihill Wines was created on a passion for fine wine and a desire to produce super premium wines equal to any. "We source fruit for our two ranges, Kirrihill Estates and Kirrihill Companions from some of Australia's most recognised wine regions, the Clare Valley, the Adelaide Hills and Langhorne Creek. This provides our wine making team led by David Mavor with a diversity of fruit supply, enabling the production of an exceptional array of premium wines equal to any in the world.
 Kirrihill

"Our winery is unlike any other in Australia. It has been purpose designed and built to provide the perfect environment for making great wines. The open-air winery without walls provides an inspiring 360-degree view of the vineyards and hills. The cantilevered roof and sailcloth provide shade for the stainless steel fermentation tanks and allow an abundance of natural light, creating a bright and open working environment.

The state-of-the-art complex has an emphasis on environmentally sound practices, including the recycling of waste water and grape marc into organic mulch for the vineyards. "The winery was established in 1999 to capitalise on the opportunities for contract processing that arose as a result of the unprecedented level of vineyard development in the prior five years. Vineyard expansion had outstripped the processing capability of the industry, which created the demand leading to the construction of the winery ready for the 2000 vintage.

The winemaking skills of the team led by David Mavor are applied to fulfilling the needs of three types of activity

Contract processing of grapes to any stage of the production cycle including storage. Currently Kirrihill Wines processes fruit for many of the large Australian wine companies as well as smaller local producers. Great wine begins in the vineyard. Super premium wines can only be made with super premium fruit. At Kirrihill Wines the winemakers work closely with selected grape growers, including Kirribilly Viticulture, to ensure the fruit meets the standards required for the high quality wines.

Cutting edge trellising technology such as Vertical Shoot Positioning provides the perfect balance of shade and sunlight, resulting in grapes with intense colour and flavour. The latest vineyard water management and irrigation methods, such as deficit regulated irrigation practices, are also utilised to increase flavour concentration and assist in the production of award-winning wines.

At the gateway to the Clare township, Kirrihill have created a haven for those who want to indulge in the partnering of quality food and wine. The winery's cellar door, nestled among gum trees and overlooking the surrounding vines and countryside, provides the perfect introduction to a range of super premium wines. The traditional cellar door tasting can be followed by anything from a great coffee to a sumptuous meal in the adjoining restaurant, Salt n Vines Bar and Bistro. While always a pleasure, a bottle of Kirrihill wine takes on a new dimension when enjoyed on the restaurant's balcony overlooking the valley

Kaesler - a
century of tradition based around the Old Vines, nurtured and handled by some of the most caring hands in the Barossa
The Kaesler Vineyards were established in 1893. The family, sprung from Silesian pioneers who came to the Barossa Valley in the 1840s, took up 96 acres in 1891. They cleared the scrub and in 1893 planted out the entire holding with Shiraz, Grenache, Mataro (Mourvedre) and White Hermitage vines.
 Kaesler

Some of the gnarled dry-grown Shiraz vines still remain and provide the backbone for the intense wines produced from the sandy loams of this prime viticultural block. In the early sixties, Arthur Kaesler saw no future in dried fruit, and pulled out the fruit trees to replace them with vines, mostly Shiraz and Grenache, still mainly for port. He also planted Mataro, just to have something different, Clare Riesling (Crouchen) and some Semillon.

The Kaeslers did not make their own wine. Traditionally, they sold their grapes to the Seppelts. The exceptional Kaesler wines now being produced had their beginning in 1997 when a young winemaker at Cellarmaster just a few hundred metres away at Dorrien noticed the power and intensity of the fruit. The old vine material was there. Led by 3.7 acres of 1893 Shiraz, more than 70% of the red vines in the vicinity of the vineyard were 40 or more years old. The Shiraz thrived on the sandy loam over clay. The Grenache was on the rockier patches, restricting the crop from this prolific producer.

Today's Kaesler Wines springs from a worldwide search for a property to produce the best possible grapes for red wine. Winemaker Reid Bosward and his co-owners, a group of international wine lovers, searched areas such as the Napa Valley, the south of France, Marlborough, and other parts of Australia before deciding on the Barossa. "No other area can produce the intensity of flavor that we have in the Barossa," says Reid.

The first site that the winelovers acquired comprised 26.3 acres of vines, eight acres of Shiraz, 5-1/2 acres of Grenache, 2-1/2 acres of Mataro, eight acres of Semillon and just over two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon. The inaugural 2000 vintage was difficult throughout the valley. Kaesler made a crush of 19.6 tonnes off the twenty six acres, but it was good stuff. In 2001, they added the crop from the newly acquired neighbouring 28.5 acres, six acres of Shiraz, eight acres of Grenache, six of Semillon, some Riesling, and some fresh plantings of Voignier. This was a variety that Reid had experience with in France as a straight white wine, and as a fascinating blend with Shiraz. The first major decision was to intensify the fruit even further. Growers who send their fruit to outside wineries may tend to keep their tonnages up. Growers who make their own wine can opt to restrict the output to increase the quality. By pruning responsibly and reducing water, Reid has already cut the yield on red wine grapes by nearly 40%. The result is density and exquisite flavour. Baume, the measure of sugar content, is high - allowing wine to be made with up to 15% alcohol.

Why make such powerful wines? "Because we can," Reid explains. "Lean wines are for a lean area. The Barossa allows us to have a high intensity of flavour. Most other places can't do this."

As treacherous as
it is beautiful, Western Australia’s rugged southwest coastline is littered with shipwrecks – the wreck of the Ringbolt being one of them
Sunk in the late 1800s in what is now known as Ringbolt Bay, located on the southern tip of the Margaret River wine region, adjacent to Cape Leeuwin. It is at Ringbolt Bay where the Southern and Indian Oceans merge and their invigorating waters lap at the edge of the Margaret River wine region.
 Ringbolt

Around 1920, the WA and UK governments established a Group Settlement Scheme for people seeking a new and better life in unchartered lands in Western Australia. The scheme was set up to establish a dairy farming industry and encourage people to make the journey to Western Australia through land grants in the Margaret River region. Faced with the prospect of living in extremely tough conditions, most of the settlers despaired and moved away – but a few remained and were the forefathers of the Margaret River wine region.

Vineyards were first planted in Margaret River in the 19th century but disappeared in the early 20th century as the markets looked elsewhere. The development of Margaret River as it exists today was largely due to Dr John S Gladstones. In 1965 Dr Gladstones emphasised the region's suitability on his report "The Climate and Soils of Southern WA in relation to Vine Growing", in which he said: “It has distinct advantages over both those areas [Manjimup and Mt. Barker], and indeed over all other Australian vine districts with comparable temperature summations…” and Margaret River was reborn.

Defined by the oceans, the Margaret River region enjoys a temperate, maritime climate with high winter rainfall and pristine, robust sea breezes to cool the precious fruit – wonderful conditions for growing superior Cabernet Sauvignon. The name Ringbolt honours the heritage of the Margaret River wine region. “Hold them fast, work them hard, build a heritage" pays homage to the beginnings of the Margaret River wine region and the colonial hardship which has made it what it is today. It reminds us of the countless years of hardship endured by the settlers and their strength, tenacity and commitment to making a go of the potential opportunity afforded to them.

Winemaker Peter Gambetta first worked with Margaret River fruit in 1986. He was determined to make wine there after sharing a bottle of Margaret River wine and recognising the potential of the region to produce something special. "That first vintage gave me an insight into the intensity and outstanding varietal flavour of Margaret River Cabernet" said Peter. It was the beginning of his association with Margaret River and his appreciation of its wines. That vintage was doubly memorable as he also met another winemaker who eventually became his wife.

Grasshopper Rock is
a small Central Otago wine producer, dedicated exclusively to the production of first class, single vineyard Pinot Noir
In establishing the vineyard, the proprietors searched for land that would provide the best conditions for consistently producing a premium Pinot Noir in a elegant Central Otago style. The chosen site is situated on Earnscleugh Road, across the Clutha River from Alexandra. The property enjoys high sunshine hours and high mean temperatures and is sufficiently harsh and difficult to make the vines work their hardest. With extremes of heat and cold comes the risk of spring and autumn frosts, providing a demanding but rewarding environment for the production of premium pinot noir.
 Grasshopper Rock

From its beginnings, Grasshopper Rock has produced award winning wines. The wine is often selected to showcase pinot noir from the Alexandra sub-region of Central Otago. The 2006 vintage achieved international acclaim when it scored 92 points (outstanding) in Robert Parker's Wine Advocate magazine in 2008. The 2007 vintage is a wine of greater intensity and was awarded three GOLD MEDALS including GOLD at the Hong Kong IWSC. The 2008 vintage has been awarded two GOLD MEDALS including GOLD at the International Wine Challange (IWC) in London and BLUE GOLD and TOP1OO at the Sydney IWC. The 2008 pinot noir is one of the best pinot noir of the vintage for Central Otago and New Zealand.

Purchased in 2002, the vineyard at Earnscleugh Road is one of the few large tracts of quality grape land in the Dunstan Basin, which surrounds Alexandra. Within the site, there are three distinct areas: blocks 1 & 2 are hill soils on shattered schist with schist outcrops; blocks 3 & 4 are at the foot of the hill, on loamy sand over schist gravel; blocks 5 & 6 are out from the hill on shallow loamy sand and stony sand on greywacke and schist gravels.

The gentle, north facing slope attracts high temperatures and has the potential to produce a unique wine of greater complexity, from the mix of pinot noir clones planted on the different blocks. 38,000 vines were planted on 8 hectares in 2003 and the first vintage was harvested in April 2006.

Earnscleugh Road is at the southern most latitude of established wine growing in Central Otago. At 45°15' south, the vineyard is one of the southern most vineyards in the world, along with a select group of other vineyards on the Earnscleugh Rim.

At Grasshopper Rock, the passion for the people who make Pinot Noir is to achieve excellence, working with the best raw materials and managing them to the best of their ability. Grasshopper Rock is a unique combination of land, climate, vines and people. The five shareholding families of Grasshopper Rock live throughout the country, from Hamilton to Invercargill. The families originally met through a common interest in agriculture, with four members involved in rural banking. Today, these interests have diversified into banking and finance, dairy farming, sheep and beef farming, pharmacy, fine arts and white baiting. All share an interest in New Zealand wine and food, and annual meetings held at Wanaka are always a celebration of the best of local produce, including their outstanding Pinot Noir.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 57706940

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services