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Pirie South Pinot Noir 2012
Established by Andrew Pirie AM
$2199each
$261DOZEN
Australia's First PhD In Viticulture A man consumed by a passion to develop Tasmania into one of the truly great wine regions of the world The Pirie vines are fortuitously planted along Tamar Valley, at latitudes very similar to Burgundy's Cote d'Or. Pinot Noir grown here has caused quite a sensation among international cognoscenti. Pirie South is about exploiting the quality and finesse of north Tasmania's fruit, to produce fresh, aromatic wines which drink beautifully while young and complement today's uber fresh styles of cuisine.
 
William Fevre Les Lys 1er Cru 2012
The soils of Les Lys are a distinguished sub appellation within the greater Les Vaillons
$5799each
$693DOZEN
Gently Sloped Soils Which Are Higher In Clay Deposits Than The Surrounding Terroirs Of Chablis Yield a noticeably elegant style which appealed to French royalty The exclusively hand picked fruit is treated to the traditional Burgundy style of barrel ferments in well seasoned oak, followed by a year or more maturation on fine lees. Her very fine perfumes and charming palate make Les Lys the perfect accompaniement to john dory fillets or dover sole.
Sir James Hardy
Hardys Sir James Pinot Chardonnay 2007
$2299each
$273DOZEN
GREAT GRANDSON OF FOUNDER THOMAS HARDY. was awarded an OBE in 1975 for a lifetime of dedication to the community and the sport of sailing. A man of great personal integrity and irresistable charm. his crest adorns every bottle of Sir James. symbolic of a commitment to fine craftsmanship. .
$5999each
$717DOZEN
EandE Sparkling Shiraz 2005 EACH YEAR A SMALL PARCEL OF E&E BLACK PEPPER SHIRAZ IS SET ASIDE FOR SECONDARY FERMENTATION AND MATURATION ON YEAST LEES. E&E have won much adulation for their Shiraz, claiming conspicuous trophies at the prestigious London International.
$1999each
$237DOZEN
Tatachilla McLaren Vale Shiraz 2014 VINES WERE PLANTED AT TATACHILLA IN 1887, today they lie scattered amongst the sloping hills and tapered basin of the McLaren Vale. The abundant variety of soils encourage a kaleidoscope of flavours, whilst the cooling ocean air and rolling gully winds cool the sun warmed grapes, allowing them to reach their full flavour potential without over ripening. A solid McLaren Vale Shiraz by one of the region's elder estates, seamless with a profound depth of flavour over chocolate velvet tannins, to be opened an hour beforehand and served alongside lamb, duck or ripe, piquant cheese.
$2999each
$357DOZEN
Palliser Estate Pinot Gris 2006 A PINOT GRIS MADE IN TRUE ALSACE STYLING, from grapes that were picked late to give good flavours and aromaticness.
$6499each
$777DOZEN
Morris Old Premium Liqueur Muscat 500ml A THICK, brown wine that's a powerful, unctuous, mouthfilling, lip-smacking delight! Great aged quality and careful use of blending that shows up the varietal characters. Fortified Wine of the Year Trophy.
Owned and operated
by the Bowen family, Bowen Estate lies towards the southern end of the famous Coonawarra wine region
Proprietor/ winemakers Doug and Emma Bowen, graduated from Roseworthy College in 1971 and Charles Sturt University in 1996, respectively. Starting with bare paddocks that had until then been part of a dairy farm, the vineyard area was originally 12 hectares. Established in 1972 on prime Terra Rossa soil, the first vintage from Bowen Estate was 1975. The Cellar Door tasting and sales facility was opened to the public in 1977. The South Block, originally a sheep farm was purchased in 1986. In 1996 a property with some established vines, was purchased directly on their northern boundary.
 Bowen Estate

The property now consists of three blocks, South, Home and North and the total vineyard area is 34 hectares. Bowen Estate vineyard is planted to Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz with smaller plantings of Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot. After several vintages of wine produced under the stars, a Mount Gambier limestone winery was built. The Honourable David Tonkin Premier of South Australia officially opened this building on 2nd November 1980.

In the vineyard at Bowen Estate, all vines are individually pruned by hand to ensure each vine produces maximum quality. Hand pruning enables the winemakers to restrict the crop size that results in wines that are full in body and have great depth of colour and longevity. The pruning and trellising of the vines is done with specific consideration being given to the growing habits of each variety of grapes in the vineyard.

This has allowed the production of a very open crop of grapes that is well ripened in the cool Coonawarra climate. Crop levels are restricted to approximately 6 tonnes per hectare for red varieties and 8.5 tonnes for Chardonnay. At this cropping level Doug Bowen feels maximum quality is ensured.

The grapes are harvested and crushed within an hour of picking. In the winery, the grapes are fermented at cool temperatures and after fermentation the Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc are aged in French and Russian oak and Shiraz in American Oak barriques. Approximately one third new oak is used each year and after 22-24 months in wood the wine is bottled ready for release.

Much of the philosophy for the style of wine produced begins with the vineyard. Firstly, the location of is on the traditional prime terra rossa soil of Coonawarra. This is of the utmost importance. Secondly, there is a very strong belief in the traditional hand pruning of vines, combined with an arch cane trellis system. This improves the evenness of budburst, bunch exposure and ripeness, but more importantly, this method of pruning ensures a balanced vine. Therefore the vine will produce fruit of optimum quality. It is this optimum fruit that makes bench mark wines which reflect the true characteristics of Coonawarra - strong varietal aromas, big flavours and soft balanced tannins.

One of the
higher profile Nelson wineries, Waimea Estates has grown quickly in size and stature since its first vineyards were planted in 1993
The Nelson River winegrowing region in general, and Waimea in particular, have a growing reputation for aromatic wines. The Sauvignon Blanc from Waimea has become a popular alternative to the Marlborough style, essentially classical in its gooseberry, lime and capsicum aromas, with a flinty palate adding to the wine’s appeal. From the first vintage release of a trophy winning Sauvignon Blanc in 1997, Waimea Estates has attracted attention. The Nelson region boasts high sunshine hours which provide ripe fruit flavours and cool evenings which give a fresh natural acidity to the wines. The stony loam soils of the Plains, along with a moderating maritime influence and a protective phalanx of hills, create the perfect terroir to produce a wide range of grapes. This combined with the high quality viticultural management and skilled winemaking help produce an excellent array of quality wines.
 Waimea

In 1993 the first vineyard of two hectares was planted, the Hill Vineyard. The 27 hectare Annabrook Vineyard was developed in 1993/4 and in 1995 the 8 hectare Hunter Vineyard was established. The 40 hectare Hope Block was planted in 1998. Over the winter of 2000 the eight hectare Packhouse Vineyard was planted. Colin’s Block was next in 2001, and then 2004/5 saw further plantings in both the Hunter Vineyard (now 20 hectares) plus a new location in Landsdowne Road (16 hectares). In 2006 another 20 hectares was planted in Colin’s Block. In total Waimea Estate now have over 130 hectares of vineyards. That’s a lot of vines whichever way you want to look at it!

Waimea Estate see themselves as guardian of the fruit between harvest and bottle, just as the vineyard workers see themselves as guardians of the land (the property is managed according to the principles of Sustainable Winegrowing). After extensive experience the aim has become one concentration, texture and balance in the wines. The philosophy is to create ultra-clean, ultra-pure fruit and densely textured, food-friendly wines.

The winery has certainly been innovative in its approaches to winemaking. Waimea Estate were one of the first wineries in New Zealand to use such new technologies as micro-oxygenation, Ganimede fermenters and cross-flow filtration. Modern winemaking delivers a synergy with those of the old world. This is illustrated well with the Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Both these varieties are wild yeast fermented. The Chardonnay is oxidatively handled and fermented warm with high solids. The Pinot Noir is destemmed only (not crushed), cool macerated and fermented hot with hand plunging. Extended élevage in barrel creates wines of finesse and elegance.

Waimea Estate is also known for iconic sweet wines – a Noble Riesling that has won trophies with every year of its production, an auslese-style Late Harvest Riesling and, latterly, a very interesting (and highly awarded) Noble Chardonnay. Besides the Pinot Noir, a further red is made in limited volume: a Merlot Cabernet blend with attractive mocha characters and not a hint of greenness. A delightful Pinot Rosé is also made – from high-quality Pinot Noir grapes; the wine is unusually part barrel-fermented in lightly-toasted oak, giving a strawberries and vanilla cream character.

The use of lees stirring is a distinct feature of the Waimea approach to aromatic wines – it is also used for Pinot Gris and Gewürztraminer. These last two wines have garnered significant interest due to their fruit-driven purity, their beautifully textured palates and their admirable balance and polish. Michael seeks to minimise unattractive phenolics by minimizing skin contact – the fruit is hand-harvested and whole-bunch pressed, and the juice has a very early press cut and is fermented with negligible solids. Fermentation is invariably stopped when the wine is off-dry, to bolster the palate with fruit sweetness. The only aromatic wine Michael does not use bâttonage on is the Riesling, where an approach of ‘less is more’ is taken. For the winery’s Dry Riesling clean fruit is very simply handled to focus the attention on pure fruit expression, while the slightly sweeter Classic Riesling is made more luscious through the inclusion of some botrytised fruit.

The image of
the hand is a symbol of strength, gateway to the heart, tiller of the soil, the mark of the artisan, and embodies the philosophy of Seresin Estate
The sentinel stone at the entrance to Seresin Estate signals the path to the winery and herald's the philosophy of the winemakers. The stone bears a subtle handprint, a symbol of the individual, and of creative endeavour. It represents a philosophy to blend tradition with technology, to work with natural elements and elicit a true Marlborough character to the wines. Organically grown, hand-tended, some fermented with wild yeasts, the grapes from the estate are raised on a cornerstone of working in harmony with nature. Complex flavours and sensational palate texture are hallmarks of Seresin.
 Seresin

The Seresin Estate grapes, gown on the Wairau River's warm alluvial terraces, are picked at the close of the long Marlborough summer. In the winery, minimal intervention allows the layers of flavour to evolve, so the wines are a natural expression of the soil from which they come. Founded in 1992 the terraces deliver natural advantages, basking in the highest sunshine hours in New Zealand, sheltered between the sweep of parallel mountain ranges. The two terraces provide distinct meso-climates and soil types: on the lower terrace, silty loam over free-draining river gravels lends elegance to our white wines, while Pinot Noir thrives on the upper level tongue of clay.

In practising biodynamics, Seresin use a range of different preparations to help balance and enrich the soils. Preparations are used in combination to enhance the availability of soil minerals to plants. A concoction of yarrow flowers and a stag's bladder enhances the activities of sulphur, nitrogen, potassium and trace elements. Dried after hanging in the open for about two weeks, the stag's bladder is stuffed with yarrow flowers and left to hang in a tree over the summer, then buried in a clay pipe over winter. The remaining material is then incorporated into the cow-pat-pits, composts and seaweed teas. Why a stag's bladder? Practically, the dried stag's bladder makes an excellent container and is fully natural and biodegradable - an example of traditional, self-sufficient agriculture using the full resources of the Estate. It is also interesting to see the structure of the yarrow flower strongly resembles a stag's antlers.

On Wednesday mornings, the Seresin Estate staff catch up for some morning tea and an informal staff meeting. After bacon & egg pie (using Seresin Estate organic eggs of course!) followed by date & caramel cake, and catching up on various vineyard, winery and marketing activities, some of the estate's barrel fermented and barrel aged wines are sampled. To finish off, the staff descend on a target vineyard block for some pruning. Each February, to coincide with the Wine Marlborough Festival, Seresin Estate invites a chef of international standing to host a series of dinners at our boatshed restaurant in Waterfall Bay, in the Marlborough Sounds.

Seresin Estate are committed to producing premium extra virgin olive oil. In the early nineties, plants from a specialist olive nursery in Tuscany, owned by the renowned Attilio Sonnoli were imported and planted to the Seresin Estate. A good selection of the classic varieties that make Tuscan extra virgin oil the best in the world were selected - Frantoio, Minerva, Leccino, Pendolino and Maurino. Each year Seresin bring out Maurizio Castelli, a Tuscan based wine and olive oil expert to Marlborough to supervise the harvest and pressing. By solely utilising fruit from groves surrounding the winery, the ultimate goals of individuality, quality and consistency are achieved

The UK Drink Tank team selected the Seresin Estate Leah Pinot Noir as their wine of the week after it achieved first or second place from all of the seven judges in a blind tasting of six wines from France, Italy, Spain, USA and New Zealand, "Whilst the All Blacks are heading home with tear-streaked cheeks and reputations in tatters, there is one New Zealander holding his head high this week. Michael Seresin, the founder, creator and dynamic force behind Seresin Estate can be rightly proud of his winning performance in the armit Drink Tank Taste-Off. The Webb Ellis Trophy will have to wait until 2011 but for those who wish to see New Zealand performing at its best, there can be no better way than cracking the cap on a bottle of Leah. Rich, generous and broad but with the definition and purity of great Pinot Noir for all to see, this is a brilliantly versatile, inspiring example of what can be produced in the land of the long white cloud!"

Right at the
heart of Coonawarra are the Rouge Homme Vineyards, established in 1908 when the Redman family purchased part of John Riddoch's Penola Fruit Colony
For half a century, the Rouge Homme winemakers supplied wine to other companies and merchants. With the inaugural release of the 1954 Cabernet Sauvignon, Rouge Homme as a winery itself began to attract some of the fame. Rouge Homme, French for Red Man, signified the similarity of the wines to the red wines of Bordeaux. The Rouge Homme Richardson's label was introduced with the 1992 vintage and named in honour of Henry Richardson. In 1892 Henry Richardson, one of the earliest Coonawarra pioneers, purchased land from the region's founder John Riddoch, and established a vineyard winery on the property.
 Rouge Homme

In 1965 the Redman family sold the vineyards and winery, which, with the original Richardson property, became Rouge Homme as it is today. Occupying about 60 hectares, the vineyards are planted with classic varieties including Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Pinot Noir, with a small amount of Chardonnay. The Rouge Homme Winery is now one of the most modern and sophisticated in the Coonawarra.

Situated in the southeast of South Australia some 50kms north of Mount Gambier, the Coonawarra grapegrowing district is a unique isolated strip of rich terra rossa soil over porous limestone. Running in a north-south direction just over 14kms long and around 2kms wide, it is an island of red soil bordered by black soil, grazing country and sandy loams. A climate of cold, wet winters and mild to warm, dry summers allows slow ripening of the grapes, with excellent development of sugar levels and flavour, and the retention of good acidity. Because of the cold winters and springs, the vines at Rouge Homme are trained over especially high trellises, with overhead mist sprinklers to protect them from frosts during spring.

Rouge Homme has maintained a tradition of crafting satisfying wines since 1952

As custodians of the Rouge Homme's great Coonawarra traditions, the winemaking team continues to produce a range of distinctive, approachable wines which have the potential to develop great complexity with bottle ageing over many years. With a considerable reputation as classic Coonawarra, Rouge Homme wines are frequent gold medal winners - particularly the reds. In 1994, Rouge Homme received what is regarded by many to be the wine industry's greatest accolade - the Jimmy Watson Memorial Trophy which was awarded to 1993 Rouge Homme Richardsons Red Block.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Victoria Licence 36144852

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services