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Torres Gran Vina Sol
$2099each
$251DOZEN
From South Australia's
Barossa
$1999each
$239DOZEN
Schild Estate Barossa GMS
Bright crimson purple. Intense spiced red cherry compote bouquet. Old vine Grenache fruit presents itself on the front palate with a juicy red berry intensity, Mourvèdre and Shiraz add blueberries, ripe lush tannins and a vibrant mineral structure. Hints of white pepper and spice over a soft tannin framework, followed by a long and supple, dynamic finish.
 
Wynns Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon 2009
Excellent Langtons Classification
$2499each
$299DOZEN
The 54th Release First produced in 1954 and widely known as Black Label Wynns Coonawarra is Australia's favourite Cabernet, having established a solid reputation for consistency and style. The redoubtable Black Label is produced from only the top tier of estate grown fruit, only one out of every five grapes make the final cut. A wine of style and stature, a perennial favourite at auction circles, Black Label is one of Australia's most collectable wines. It offers oustanding early drinking with superb potential for cellaring.
$999each
$119DOZEN
Gunn Estate Sauvignon Blanc 2011 AN INVIGORATINGLY PURE VARIETAL WHITE BY TOP WINEMAKING MARKSMAN DENIS GUNN, expressing the qualities of Hawkes Bay terroir, focusing on the strengths of the Gunn vineyard. Completely satisfying, redolent with zing galore and the big fruit driven character of the district, made in an uncomplicated early drinking style. A sensational, well balanced and fully integrated Sauvignon Blanc upon release, you'll enjoy Gunn Estate just on it's own, or as a smart accompaniement to fresh grilled fishes and crispy skin chicken.
$5299each
$635DOZEN
Kaesler Bogan Shiraz THE FIRST KAESLER VINEYARDS WERE ESTABLISHED CIRCA 1893, the Bogan Block at Marananga was planted in 1899. Kaesler are the grateful custodians of these marvelous old vines, which have seen the federation of a nation, two world wars and several generations of blood sweat and tears. The amazing quality of fruit from Bogan are combined with parcels from Kaesler's 1965 Nuriootpa block, planted to the same clonal material as the precious Old Bastard vineyard, crafted to form a synergy between the finest Barossa Shiraz and quality new oak.
$2699each
$323DOZEN
Two Hands Angels Share Shiraz AFTER THE CRUSHING OF GRAPES AND COMPLETION OF FERMENTS, most red wines are filled to oak, it is here that the ageing barrels must be topped up from time to time, as a portion of the stocks evaporate into thin air. It's known in winemaking parlance as angel's share. A wine of great personality, personable and charismatic, the very best of McLaren Vale in every way, Angels Share articulates the more vivaciously ripe and upfront style of Aussie Shiraz.
$1599each
$191DOZEN
Gapsted Tobacco Road Merlot GAPSTED ARE REAL WINES MADE BY REAL PEOPLE, a partnership between dedicated viticulturalists and a distinguished winemaking team. The propitious compact means that everything by Gapsted carries the signature and personality of the people involved, the charm of small vineyards and influence of choice microclimes. The labour of love and passion by mates who share a desire to create appealing and personable wines, Tobacco Road is a compelling example of high country Merlot, endowed by ripe red fruit flavours and supported by well structured tannins.
Situated entirely within
the defined Rutherglen Wine Region, the Campbell vineyards total approximately 64 hectares of trialled and proven varietals
Rutherglen's warm and dependable climate is, in many ways similar to the Rhone region of France and it comes as no surprise that the Rhone specialties of Shiraz (known as Syrah in France) and Durif prosper here. The vital ingredient to Rutherglen's climate is the normally long, warm and dry Autumn ripening period. This enables the grapes to slowly and consistently ripen to maturity, producing the true varietal flavours so evident in the Campbell reds and whites.
 Campbells

The grapes are confidently left to linger on the vine and develop the high natural sugar levels and complexity required to produce the unique Muscat and Tokay of Rutherglen. With the range of grape varieties, different vineyard management techniques are employed to maximize each variety's potential. Scott Henry and Geneva Double Curtain are just a few of the trellising systems in use to vary fruit exposure and ripening processes.

Campbell's of Rutherglen grow Chardonnay, Semillon, Riesling, Trebbiano and Pedro Ximenez. The red varieties include Shiraz, the rare Durif, Cabernet Sauvignon, Ruby Cabernet and Malbec. The world renowned Rutherglen Muscats are made from the variety Muscat Petits Grains Rouge, and the Rutherglen Tokay from Muscadelle. Campbell's nursery block is home to many experimental varieties such as Viognier and Roussane, displaying the winemaking family's commitment to innovation in the vineyard.

The Campbell vineyards are in a unique and privileged position. Campbells of Rutherglen are the bearers of over four generations of winemaking knowledge, decades of aged stocks of wine, and some of the most modern winemaking technology available. This allows skillfully management of the ancient Soleras, not only to produce the grand Rutherglen Muscats and Tokays, but to capture the pure natural grape flavours of Rutherglen varieties, and to express them fully in the winery's sensational red and white table wines.

A full range of winemaking techniques is used to craft the award winning reds and whites. The use of heat exchangers and refrigerated storage is coupled to gentle tank pressing and controlled fermentation to protect delicate fruit aromas. Rotary fermenters enhance colour extraction for red wines. French and American oak barrels are used sparingly in the fermentation and maturation of some wines, always to enhance, never to dominate the natural fruit flavours. In total contrast, the fortified cellar remains the domain of ancient barrels gently nurturing their precious contents for decade upon decade of ageing to mellow maturity. The ancient Soleras are painstakingly nurtured by the devoted winemaking team.

The skilful art of blending, handed down to Colin Campbell by his forebears, is painstakingly carried out to ensure consistency of quality and the perpetuation of the Campbells style - from the most youthful muscats and tokays to the richest and most complex rare classification.

The Wirra Wirra
Cellars were built by Robert Strangways Wigley, one of the McLaren Vale's all time characters
Wigley began building at the turn of the century using Dr. A.C. Kelly's plans of a split-level design that his friend Alec Johnston had used to build the Pirramimma winery. Wirra Wirra is an aboriginal name meaning amongst the gums. Born in 1864, Bob Wigley studied Law and Architecture and managed to play cricket for South Australia. His wild pranks as a young man had already made him somewhat of an embarrassment to his family. In 1893 he was prudently sent to rusticate in McLaren Vale. He planted the vineyard in 1894 and made his first wine with Alec Johnston in 1897. By 1901 he was the owner of one of the best wineries and vineyards in the district with 100 acres under vines and 15 acres under currants.
 Wirra Wirra

Stylistically, Wirra Wirra established a long and distinguished history for itself of producing wines with great elegance, balance and complexity. "Mr. Thomas Hardy says of all those he ever had under him, no town man worked harder than Mr. Bob Wigley who was at Bankside for 18 months learning winemaking. At the end of this time he took up 240 acres of land at McLaren Vale, and has succeeded in producing wonderfully fine full-bodied Burgundy, especially suited for the export trade." - The Register Adelaide Australia 1903

Bob Wigley died in 1924 having contributed much to the life of the district and having made many fine wines which in the main found their way to England, having been shipped by Burgoynes of London. After 1936 the original 240 acres were sold by his family and eventually the cellars with only 7 acres left fell into disuse. It was not until late 1969 that the winery, by then virtually a derelict building, and the surrounding 7 acres of land was re-established.

Cousins Greg and Roger Trott purchased the holding from Vern Sparrow, son of Wigley's foreman Jack Sparrow. Roger Trott, an accountant, has a property at McLaren Flat, Moray Park, and Greg's vineyard. Bethany, is just across the road from Wirra Wirra, while Scrubby Rise, part of the original Wirra Wirra, is immediately in front of the cellars. Before they bought the old, ruined winery, Greg spent five years with Southern Vales Co-operative looking after growers interests and in his own words, had become familiar with the rudiments of winemaking.

Like many of the McLaren Vale winemakers, these men were helped by their friendly rivals, a feature of the district. Good use was made of Oenological Services of McLaren Vale, a winemaking advisory and laboratory service led by Peter Klose and started by David Hardy, Alex Johnston and Colin Kay. In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins.

In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins. In its modern day, Wirra Wirra has hosted a vast and eclectic array of winemakers, cellar hands, drifters and vagrants each vintage. One of the most interesting things about February, is the influx of a range of recalcitrants from all over the world. Yanks, Poms, Krauts, Frogs, Kiwis, Queenslanders, the occasional Aussie and more, all converge on the cellars to pick, pump, drain, crush, press, and massage the fruit that comes in from the vineyards. There is now nothing quirky about the design of the winery, which is in its third stage of development. Although functional and technologically advanced, the cellars retain a soul. This is largely due to the spirit of the tribe that work there.

Around 500,000,000 years
ago, the cooling earth formed Cambrian rock, which today exists as a discontinuous band of red soils, extending from Heathcote township, running north past Colbinabbin, parallel to the Mount Camel range
The Tatiarra Vineyard is sustained by a band of this ancient Cambrian soil in which Shiraz vines thrive, producing fruit of incomparable quality and wines of matchless character. The resulting wines are perfectly balanced, possessing tremendous exuberance and are capable of long term cellar development. Tatiarra does not have a grand history. There are no generations of grape growers or winemakers on the board or amongst its shareholders. It is not in the possession of a heritage building nor is it the culmination of a long and colourful past. On the contrary, Tatiarra is a modern company firmly rooted in the terroir of the vineyard and sustained by a dream that is now in the process of becoming a reality.
 Tatiarra

The selection of a vineyard site is of paramount importance and it can take years to find the right piece of terroir. Bill Hepburn discovered his dream on the west slopes of Mt.Camel in the Heathcote district, planting a 10 acre vineyard of Shiraz vines on 143 acres of rare, north facing Cambrian Earth. It was a modest start, with borrowed equipment, friendly neighbours and supportive family. Bill spent those early years camped in a caravan, which remains on site, not far from a large gum tree under which he built a ‘thunderbox’ (the Australian country version of an outdoor toilet).

The cold nights finally got to Bill and he decided it was time to pass the dream on. In 2001, Domaines Tatiarra purchased the property and continues to develop the original dream. Bill Hepburn oversaw the growing of the grapes used in the first vintage of Tatiarra Cambrian Shiraz and remains involved with the development of the company as a very interested outsider. The Caravan of Dreams Shiraz Pressings is made in Bill Hepburn's honour.

Today Tatiarra vineyard continues to attract visionaries. Tatiarra winemaker, Ben Riggs has his own dream about Heathcote and Shiraz. Ben is based in McLaren Vale, South Australia where his obsession for producing extraordinary Shiraz is well known. With Tatiarra, he was challenged to produce a wine that would rank amongst the giants of the Shiraz world – Tatiarra Trademark Shiraz – a unique blend of McLaren Vale and Heathcote fruit.

As Bill Hepburn’s dream continues to inspire wine enthusiasts, it is comforting to know that the integrity of his original vision is being well preserved. Contracts have been let to expand the original Tatiarra vineyard with a further 12.75 acres in 2003. The new planting will be complete by November of that year. The same clone of Shiraz has been selected for the new block, as its performance to date has been outstanding, but one proviso stands – the clone does not respond well to heavy cropping. Therefore, yields will be maintained below the average of 2.65 tonnes per acre.

The yields at Tatiarra are kept well below the ‘magic’ three tonnes per acre limit that seems vital if super premium grapes are to be grown. The Tatiarra business model has an average yield forecast of 2.65 tonnes per acre, however, to date this figure has not been reached. A combination of the dry growing conditions and cane pruning has resulted in the 2002 vintage being cropped at 1.6 tonnes per acre, whilst the 2003 vintage was cropped at 2.3 tonnes per acre. This has resulted in two exceptionally concentrated vintages.

Bruce and Jeanette
Tomlinson established Lenton Brae Estate in 1982, the site of the vineyard being chosen after a chance conversation with Bill Pannell, owner of neighbouring Moss Wood
The Lenton Brae vineyard is in the Wilyabrup sub-region. Wilyabrup was the site chosen for the first vine plantings in 1967 and is acknowledged as the epicenter for superior Margaret River Cabernet Sauvignon. The white varieties of Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon also perform well. The best soils in Wilyabrup (and Lenton Brae) are a gravelly loam of a depth 500 – 800mm over a clay base. The varieties selected for planting were Chardonnay, Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Pinot Noir was also originally planted but has since been removed to increase the acreage of the preferred Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The name Lenton Brae comes from the chapel district of Lenton in Nottingham, England. It is from here that the first Tomlinson’s migrated to Australia in 1882. Brae is a Scottish term for a small hill, which is what the Wilyabrup vineyard is situated on.
 Lenton Brae

Bill Pannell had engaged Bruce Tomlinson to assist with the shire of Busselton’s planning requirements for dividing the Moss Wood property. During a casual chat between the two men, Bill mentioned that the soils of one of the newly created properties were uniformly excellent and equal to those of the existing Moss Wood vineyard. Impressed by this information Bruce decided to purchase the property and try his hand at viticulture. Following the purchase Bruce appointed Bill Jamieson, the retired Head of Viticulture at the Western Australian Department of Agriculture as a consultant. Ten hectares of vineyard were planted in the spring of 1983.

The winery was built in 1988 and the first vintage in the new building was in 1989. Bruce designed and built the winery, which incorporates the cellar sales gallery that has sweeping views across the Wilyabrup valley. The building has since been heritage listed by the shire of Busselton.

In 1987, the first commercial crop was harvested, with the wines being vinified at another local winery. The first release was the 1987 Semillon Sauvignon Blanc. The first Cabernet Sauvignon was from the 1988 vintage. This wine won two trophies at the 1990 SGIO W.A winemakers’ exhibition, including best wine of show. Further success followed in 1992, with the Chardonnay winning gold and three trophies at the 1992 Perth Royal Wine Show.

The gravelly loam facilitates water drainage whilst not supporting excessive vigour. The clay base retains moisture and encourages root penetration. The estate vineyard comprises some nine hectares. Approximately 60% of planting is to the white grapes with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot making up the balance. Some sections have been replanted since to introduce new clones and healthier stock.

Currently there are four different clones of Chardonnay in production and new clones of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot are planned. It is envisaged new plantings will be on grafted rootstock to give greater uniformity and vine efficiency in its uptake of water and nutrients. The rainfall is winter dominant, with approximately 80% falling between April and September. The prevailing dry conditions during the final fruit ripening in early autumn allow for low humidity and disease pressures. All vines have access to drip irrigation. Experience has demonstrated that irrigation improves vine health and that healthy vines produce the highest quality grapes.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services