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Grant Burge Barossa Vines GSM
A sultry wine with indulgent layers of complexity
$1599each
$191DOZEN
Barossa Vines GMS Combines 50% Grenache 33% Mourvedre and 17% Shiraz from fruit grown on Grant's own vineyards and those of respected growers around the Barossa.
 
Woodlands Brook Vineyard Cabernet Clementine
Clémentine is sourced entirely from Woodlands Brook Vineyard
$4099each
$491DOZEN
Established To Merlot And Malbec Verdot and Franc a superior northwest facing site on free draining Wilyabrup soils. A block of Cabernet vines were later added to a patch of auspicious heavy gravel clay soils, perfect for the realization of powerful Cabernet Sauvignon. Salinity, cocoa and clove, blood orange and river silt, the elegant palate brimming with ripe red fruits, a lovely mix of floral elements and winegum lozenge complexity, Clémentine lingers endlessly on a line of lively mineral acidity.
 
Brian Fletcher Mano Rosso Nero dAvola Shiraz
$2299each
$275DOZEN
$2299each
$275DOZEN
Sticks Yarra Valley Pinot Noir ROB STICKS DOLAN'S CAREER IN THE WINE INDUSTRY BEGAN UNDER THE TUTELAGE OF GREG CLAYFIELD AND JOHN VICKERY AT THE ENDURING ROUGE HOMME. Dolan established his affinity for Pinot Noir on the international stage when he claimed the prestigious Bouchard-Finlayson Trophy for Champion Pinot Noir at the prestigious London International. Sticks represents an immensely satisfying and approachable Pinot Noir, crafted from fruit grown to some of Yarra Valley's most splendid vineyards, tended by loyal friends and long time associates.
$4999each
$599DOZEN
Escarpment Estate Pinot Noir ESCARPMENT IS A JOINT VENTURE BY HEATHCOTE ESTATE/ YABBY LAKE'S DYNAMIC DUO, the Messrs Kirby and McKenna. No expense was spared, the pick of Pinot Noir rootstock and clones were established to precious alluvial gravel terraces at the base of Aorangi Ranges. Inspired by the classics of Burgundy, Escarpment expresses the distinctive character of Martinborough's unique terroir. Engaging perfumes, elegant flavours and soft ripe tannins are all hallmarks of the finest Martinborough Pinot Noir.
$2199each
$263DOZEN
Wolf Blass Gold Label Barossa Cabernet 2013 GOLD LABEL SHOWCASES THE WOLF BLASS TEAM'S DEVOTION TO VITICULTURE AND SKILL AT VINIFICATION. Barossa Cabernet Sauvignon is known for its richness and warmth, a generous red wine that's balanced and approachable even in its youth. Wolf Blass source fruit from vineyards which have been trained to provide vintages of Barossa Cabernet with perfumed fruit characters, vevety chocolate berry flavours and genteel tannins. Just splendid alongside roast lamb racks and smashed potatoes, dressed in garlic and red wine jus.
$4099each
$491DOZEN
Kalleske Greenock Shiraz THE KALLESKE FAMILY HAVE BEEN GROWING GRAPES AND MAKING BAROSSA VALLEY WINE SINCE 1853. One of the more distinguished members of the prestigious Grange Growers Club, the Kalleskes have also become one of Barossa Valley's most compelling and contemplative new labels. Greenock Shiraz is 100% biodynamic, as accredited by Australian Certified Organic, sourced from a single low yielding block, established to ancient cuttings, along the western edge of Greenock Creek in the northwest Barossa Valley.
The Wilson Vineyard
is a small family winery in the Polish Hill River sub-region of South Australia's Clare Valley
In 1973, John Wilson set out with soil map and sampling auger in search for the plot for his vines. The chosen land was some of the grazing slopes east of Sevenhill. The locals were bemused by this venture and were firm but kind with their advice about the unsuitability of the area for grapes. To that same handful of locals the little valley was known as Polish Hill River, a quaint tribute to its early pioneers. In 1980 the vineyard produced its first commercial wine and with that Shiraz-Cabernet, wine consumers were introduced to this hitherto unknown corner of Clare. By then no-one had any doubts about the ability of Polish Hill River to produce fine wine. The Wilson family has been content to expand its operation slowly and steadily and is unfussed that most who followed them now cultivate larger tracts.
 Wilson Vineyard

The winery only processes estate-grown fruit. More than half of the production is Riesling and Cabernet Sauvignon, both of which are produced under the Gallery Series label, which features a different artist each year. Other wines include a Zinfandel, a fortified Traminer, Chardonnay, and Shiraz. Hippocrene is a distinctive sparkling red wine produced since 1990.

The Clare Valley whilst being a catchy marketing term, is in fact incorrect. There is no single valley, while there is a plateau corrugated by ridges that generally run in a north-south direction. The central feature of this plateau is Mount Horrocks (600 m). South of Mount Horrocks there are three valleys: the Wakefield River, Eyre Creek, and the Skillogalee Creek, that join and flow west to Port Wakefield.

Flowing north are the valleys of the Hill River and the Hutt River, that ultimately flow into the Broughton and meet the sea at Port Davis (between Port Broughton and Port Pirie). Polish Hill River is located on the upper reaches of the Hill River. The soil at Polish Hill River is an acidic red-brown clayey-loam. In contrast to the Watervale sub-region to the south of Mount Horrocks, there is no limestone at Polish Hill River. Geologically the region is of ancient shale and an extension of the famous Mintaro slate. (The slate quarry at nearby Mintaro remains the only site in Australia where it is possible to obtain a sheet of slate large enough for a full-size billiard table)

In the extreme north-west corner of the vineyard, and on the highest part of the property is a small 2 hectare planting of young riesling vines, that is known as the DJW block, so called because Daniel James Wilson planted the patch. In 2001 it yielded its first economic crop, and it was Daniel's choice that the wine should be kept separate from the rest of the Riesling production and produced as an individual vineyard bottling.

Daniel James Wilson's faith was justified, when in June 2002 the 2001 DJW Riesling was awarded the trophy for the best boutique riesling in the Boutique Wine Awards. That 2001 DJW Riesling also won a gold medal in the 2002 Clare Valley Wine Show category for non-commercial riesling. The 2003 vintage has continued the winning streak, and in the 2003 Clare Valley Wine Show was awarded the Mick Knappstein Trophy for the best commercial riesling (current vintage), and the Jim Barry Perpetual Trophy for the best wine of the show. In August 2004 this wine was awarded the top honour for riesling in the Tri-Nation awards, held in Sydney. This award judges the best wines submitted from South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia. The Wilson Vineyard Rieslings are powerful wines that take more than five years in the bottle to show their best, and have consistently shown themselves to be amongst the nation's best.

For almost two
decades the renowned Mitchelton winery has been producing the immensely popular Preece range of wines
In 1967 Melbourne entrepreneur Ross Shelmerdine commisioned wine industry stalwart Colin Pearce to find the best site for premium grape growing anywhere in south eastern Australia. Preece chose an old grazing estate, prized for it's climate, soil and proximity to the waterways. Colin Preece, one of the great winemakers of the 20th century, and for decades chief winemaker at Seppelt Great Western, came out of a ten-year retirement to help found Mitchelton in 1973.
 Preece

Led by viticulturalist John Beresford, the Mitchelton winemakers are caretakers rather than scientists. They like running Victorian dirt through their fingers, nuturing the vines but letting the grapes do all the real talking. Each of the delicately crafted, single varietal wines displays the pinnacle of cool climate complex aromas, intense flavour, a spectrum of perfumes, refinement and distinction. It shows every time you open a bottle of Preece.

Grapes grown in different climates produce very different styles of wine. This is because the cooler the climate, the slower it takes for the grapes to ripen, and the longer the grapes have to ripen, the more time they have to perfect their flavour. Anyone who knows anything about Victorian weather knows that, even in the warmest months, Victoria can be pretty cool. To ensure the fruit ripens, the grapes are left on the vines up to three months longer than in other wine regions.

It's in this time that the grapes are afforded the luxury of slow ripening, allowing them to develop a greater spectrum and depth of flavour, wonderfully delicate aromas and a backbone of freshness. Not even a fast paced world will hurry the grapes from the Mitchelton vineyards into ripening sooner.

Combining years of hands-on experience and an intimate understanding of the estate, the Preece philosophy is to unlock the best fruit from Victorian vineyards through innovation and attention to detail. A diversity of vineyard sites creates a rich range of fine wines brimming with a complex balance of flavours. The unique microclimates of the Mitchelton Preece vine parcels allow the development of a more intense spectrum of elegant flavours and delicious lifted aromas.

Coupled with judicious use of innovative winemaking techniques, this approach gives shape and definition to the expressive qualities of Preece, creating wines of distinct personality, finesse and longevity. With the focus on individual block-targeting, each vineyard is selected for the most suitable grape variety, clone and rootstock combination. This intensive approach ensures every Preece wine achieves its full potential, expressing superior flavour profiles and good structure.

Scotchmans Hill is
a family owned vineyard and winery based on the Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria, Australia
Established in 1982, Scotchmans Hill has become a producer of some of Australia's most complex, elegant and consistent wines. Scotchmans Hill is located on Mount Bellarine which was named by the Scottish immigrants who settled the Mount Bellarine area in the 1840s. Mount Bellarine was formed over 30 million years ago by tectonic movement which formed Port Phillip Bay and the surrounding volcanic region of Geelong and Mount Bellarine.
 Scotchmans Hill

The Geelong region's role in the development of the Australian wine industry began in 1842 when the first planting of vines was undertaken in the surrounding Barrabool Hills. Grown and managed mainly by Swiss immigrants, these vineyards were used to produce wine to be sold through the frequently held auctions in the city. The area flourished under the experienced management and by 1869 there were over 400 hectares planted. Many notable Swiss vine growers visiting added superior knowledge and quality to the wines.

Today there remains 250 vine growing hectares in the Geelong region. The Browne family have a history in the region when George and Rita Browne would visit their holiday destination in Portarlington taking their children with them. Their son, David Browne, became very familiar with the region and when given the chance to own property on Mount Bellarine in 1975 he and wife Vivienne bought Scotchmans Hill, a derelict dairy farm.

Scotchmans Hill enjoys a maritime climate, moderated by the relatively cool, dry climate and constant breeze from the 270 degree surrounding waters of Port Phillip Bay

The Southern Ocean and strong, cool Atlantic winds combine to produce the cool maritime climate of the Bellarine Peninsula. The vineyards at Scotchmans Hill are planted on north facing slopes at a latitude of 42 degrees south and an altitude of approximately 120 metres. The combination of these factors greatly reduces the risk of disease, the use of agrochemicals and synthetic additives.

As an extension to their activities, the Scotchmans Hill contract consultancy company allows suitable grape varieties to be grown in appropriate mesoclimates around the Bellarine Peninsula and Geelong. Current contracts amount to 170 acres from ten growers.

Disease and pest control have been minimized by the installation of a meteorological information center. This maintains online climatic data with which our viticulturist can make timely decisions in determining necessary disease and pest control measures. The system further minimizes the necessity for agrochemical and synthetic input.

The original Jamiesons
Run was a remote outback sheep station owned by the Jamiesons Brothers in the mid 1800's
Jamiesons Run, based in the heart of the famous Coonawarra region was named as a tribute to it's pioneering past. Two men separated by time and distance laid the foundations for Jamiesons Run's creation. The first was Alfred Deakin, Australia's second prime minister with the assistance of Canadian irrigation experts William and George Chaffey and the second was John Riddoch.
 Jamiesons Run

John Riddoch, a Scottish migrant, established the Coonawarra Fruit Colony and planted the first vines in the Coonawarra area in 1890. The Undoolya Block vineyard contains hundred-year-old vines that date back from Riddoch's time, and is located close to where the Jamiesons Run winery is today.

Riddoch discovered the region's brick red coloured soil that was to become known as Terra Rossa - Australia's most famous wine-growing soil. Jamiesons Run's connection with Coonawarra started in 1953 as Mildara Wines under the guidance of director Ron Haselgrove, who purchased what turned out to be some of the most sought after parcels of Terra Rossa soil in Coonawarra.

The Limestone Coast is composed of several key wine making regions, Mount Benson, Coonawarra, Wrattonbully and Padthaway

Winemakers all over the world agree that "great wine is grown in the vineyard" - but to grow great wine you first need great soil. The international fame of Coonawarra is built on Australia's most prized wine growing soil, Terra Rossa. Coupled with a cooler maritime climate that ensures maximum flavour complexity, Terra Rossa (meaning 'Red Land') has made Coonawarra a winemaking paradise.

Although the Terra Rossa strip is only a few feet higher than neighbouring soils it has better drainage as a result. Vines dislike having 'wet feet' as this hampers their root development. Wet soil also means cold soil and it is a vital part of the Coonawarra phenomenon that, despite its cooler climate, grapes here repeatedly reach optimum ripeness. It is the warmth of the Terra Rossa soils that allow this consistency. An ideal mineral profile and low nitrogen content are also vital for taming the natural vigour of vines and producing low yields of highly flavoured fruit.

The Jamiesons Run core range consists of the original Coonawarra Cabernet Shiraz Merlot and four siblings. The Chardonnay has luscious stonefruit and creamy oak characters. The Coonawarra Merlot is a seductive wine with violets and red berries on the nose and palate. The Cabernet Sauvignon is an elegant and rich cabernet with sweet dark plum, mulberry and blueberry fruit flavours while the Shiraz displays ripe blackberry and dark cherry with subtle hints of spice giving the wine lift and grace. The Coonawarra Cabernet Shiraz Merlot is a classic expression of one of the world's great red winegrowing regions.

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services