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Pertaringa Stage Left Merlot
Even the finest Merlot is rarely seen front and centre as a pure varietal wine
$2199each
$263DOZEN
Pertaringa Manage An Endowment Of The Finest McLaren Vale Vineyards And Can Call On Harvests Of Superior Fruit For The Construct Of An Exclusively Merlot Wine Layers of fleshy plum flavour velvet textures and pliable tannins define the structure and style of Stage Left, essentially a splendid food friendly mode of Merlot, the first choice to accompany quails wrapped and grilled in pancetta or delicately braised game over red wine Jus and pureed parsnip grits.
 
Bass Phillip Premium Chardonnay
$8999each
$1079DOZEN
 
Voyager Estate Shiraz 2008
A rich and concentrated effort with driven fruit and silky tannins
$3499each
$419DOZEN
Defining A Style Of It's Very Own Small batch fermentation and sensitive winemaking practices are employed to allow quality of fruit from to be fully expressed An impressive Margaret River wine which continues the evolution of Shiraz at Voyager Estate.
$2049each
$245DOZEN
Mr Riggs Gaffer Shiraz JOHN THE GAFFER RIGGS (1814-1902), great great great grandfather of Ben Riggs, migrated from Dorsetshire and settled in Gawler 1855. One of South Australia's most prominent farmers, he owned hundreds of acres dedicated to wheat. His sheep flock was also highly regarded and his methods progressive for the time. Success in the wheat trade was matched by significant awards at exhibitions in Sydney, London and Paris. Ben Riggs' own love of the land and his passion for it's offerings are directly attributable to the efforts of his far sighted ancestor.
$7999each
$959DOZEN
Katnook Estate Prodigy Shiraz 2003 SILVER MEDAL WINNER LONDON INTERNATIONAL WINE CHALLENGE.
$3299each
$395DOZEN
Bowen Estate Shiraz 2008 A PERENNIAL BENCHMARK IN COONAWARRA SHIRAZ, by a couple who have been crafting conspicuous regional editions for over thirty years. Opulent with enticing aromas, heady flavours, stylish oak and fine tannins.
$1799each
$215DOZEN
Trentham Family Nebbiolo THE FAMIGLIA RANGE OF WINES IS ALL ABOUT FINE TUNING THE CLASSIC ITALIANS INTO A CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN STYLING. A profound rendering of Nebbiolo, the unique varietal grape most responsible for the lovely wines of Piedmonte, sumptuous, dry and nicely spiced. An intriguing nose with hints of rose petal, leather and tar, for which Nebbiolo is renowned, but primarily a wine driven by red and black berry fruit flavours and aromas. Dress up your turkey and bring her along for a long leisurely lunch with La Famiglia Nebbiolo.
After a decade
of confusion about his distinguished history and name, which continues as a famous Clare Valley that he founded in the 1970s, Tim Knappstein made the decision to launch a new label in 2006
The name chosen was Riposte, for which the dictionary definition is comeback, a quick reply, retort, or in the context of the sport of fencing a quick counter stroke. The wines, sourced from selected premium vineyards in South Australia’s cool climate Adelaide Hills, carry sword names reflecting the fencing theme. They display the pure varietal characters of this exceptional cooler region. The aim of Riposte is to deliver top quality wines at affordable prices aided by meticulous winemaking, rigourous grape selection and Tim’s 40 years of winemaking and judging experience. Tim Knappstein stands tall among Australia’s elite winemakers, a third generation vigneron with 40 years experience producing wines of finesse and excellence.
 Riposte

Tim commenced winemaking in Clare, South Australia, with the renowned Knappstein family owned Stanley Wine Company. Within a decade, Tim had won more than 500 show awards, gold medals and trophies for the company’s premium Leasingham range, though his unrequited passion for cool climate wines led Tim to the Adelaide Hills in 1981, where he planted the first vineyard in the Lenswood district. Respected as one of Australia’s most informed and experienced cool climate vignerons, Tim has judged at regional, state, national and international wine shows since 1975, and is currently chairman of judges at the Cowra Wine Show and National Cool Climate Wine Show in Bathurst, New South Wales.

Tim Knappstein’s hand-crafted wines continue to attract the highest accolades. Verifying his expertise as a cool climate wine craftsman, Tim’s pinot noir from the Adelaide Hills has won trophies on seven of the 11 times it has been entered in the Adelaide Hyatt Advertiser Wine Awards.

Working closely with selected growers to obtain the highest quality fruit, Tim’s vast knowledge and expert skills enable him to produce highly individual cool climate wines of undisputed premium quality – evident throughout the impressive Riposte portfolio of wines.

Tim makes much of his Pinot Noir in the lighter French styles of the suppler Burgundies or crisp Beaujolais. The Dagger is a rich fresh earlier drinking wine with all the trademark Pinot aromas and flavours. Drink when young while the edge is keen. Currently being served by Qantas in Business Class.

The fruit for Cutlass Shiraz is selected from a vineyard at Woodside in the Adelaide Hills. Small batches of grapes are crushed, fermented and pressed separately then aged in French oak. The best barrels are then selected and blended before bottling. The Stiletto Pinot Gris glides seductively across the palate from initial lifted nashi pear and tropical characters to a final stab of spice. Supple rich, mouth filling fruit leads to a finely honed finish of crisp acidity. The Foil Sauvignon reflects the region’s reputation for excellent and memorable Sauvignon Blanc. The Rapier Traminer is crushed and immediately pressed, separated and fermented in French Oak to provide extra texture and complexity with the juice settled to moderate clarity.

In August 1975
David and Christine Fyffe purchased a property near Yarra Junction that has softly undulating good soil and fabulous views to Mt Donna Buang
In the spring that followed they erected makeshift houses to stay in while they planted vines on their days off from running Mayerling Cellars. Initial plantings were 2 acres each of pinot noir, cabernet sauvignon and half an acre of gewrztraminer, which was fairly quickly replanted with merlot when it lost popularity. The original name Settlement Vineyards was already registered so they settled on Yarra Burn, as the property is located half way between the two small townships of Yarra Junction and Wesburn. Part time study in viticulture and oenology at Roseworthy and Charles Sturt and help from consultants contributed to Yarra Burn's success. In late 1977 the Fyffes sold their bottleshop to build a house and an estate winery at Yarra Burn. They were encouraged and assisted by their friends at Jean Jacques by the Sea in establishing an onsite restaurant.
 Yarra Burn

The first wines were released from the vintage of 1978, two editions of shiraz from grapes grown to other Yarra Valley vineyards. The first was the Launching Place Shiraz and the other was a Shiraz from what is now the Yarra Yering Vineyard in Coldstream. In the spring of 1978 they expanded the vineyard and planted chardonnay to add to the range. The operations grew and Yarra Burn went on to experience great success in wine competitions in the mid-eighties, the Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon from 1984 receiving 8 Gold Medals and 7 trophies between them.

It is only with great patience involving 30 years of experience and experimentation, that the winemakers at Yarra Burn have found the perfect sites for each noble variety and, from them, nurtured wines of unique elegance and finesse. David and Christine Fyffe reckon that the Yarra Burn site chose itself, really. The cool breezes that sweep over the vineyard from the mountain peaks are replaced by the blissful warmth of the afternoon sun. The soil is fertile. And winter rain is plentiful. But don't let that fool you, this idyllic setting exacts a price. Every detail has to be just so.

The Yarra Valley is Victoria's oldest winegrowing region, and the coldest on the Australian mainland. Unlike the typical homogeneous, flat and warm-climate regions of Australia, the Yarra Valley is despite its singular name actually a series of valleys framed to the east by the Great Dividing Range and dominated by the majestic Mount Donna Buang. What these valleys have in common is that they all drain into the Yarra River. But the region is characterised by startling differences in soil composition, sun exposure, altitude and accessibility.

The terroir changes noticeably from hill to hill and sometimes even on the same hill. Naturally, this presents a winemaker with a vast palette of opportunities (including innumerable ways to go wrong). Little wonder that the region foundered in the 1930s. In the 1960s, however, the Yarra Valley found a new awakening. And Yarra Burn was one of the pioneers of this second wave, encouraged and intrigued by its obvious potential.

The south-facing slope of one hill at Yarra Burn is mountain-goat steep. That's why, to quote the brave souls who have to work it, it's become known as Bastard Hill. Needless to say, it's a risky place to work, ideally requiring one leg that's 15 centimetres shorter than the other for maximum stability. But it's also a risky place to grow grapes. Facing south and being so high, grapes take an inordinate amount of time to ripen. So those years when the grapes are at their zenith (and only those years), Yarra Burn favour them with kid-gloves treatment to make wine under the Bastard Hill label.

In 1885 John
Francis Brown, aged 18 planted ten acres of mostly Riesling, Muscat and Shiraz grapes on his Milawa property, located in the lower reaches of the King Valley in North East Victoria
Milawa Vineyard is the birth place of the Brown Brothers company, the first Brown Brothers wines were released in 1889. Surrounding the cellar door, Milawa Vineyard is the fruit source for renowned wines such as Patricia Noble Riesling, Shiraz Mondeuse & Cabernet and Dolcetto. It is also home to Brown Brothers’ winemaking facilities where grapes are received, crushed and made into quality wine. The current expanse of Brown Brothers vineyards, now located throughout Victoria, are as varied as the wines and wine styles.
 Brown Brothers

Within a 50km radius of Milawa, climatic conditions range from cool alpine areas to lush temperate valleys to sun drenched plains. Each of the vineyards have been selected on the basis of their suitability for the variety or wine style. Varietal diversity through the Brown Brothers range provides a point of difference and offers consumers the ability to experiment across a range.

Brown Brothers Whitlands Vineyard
One of Australia's highest and coolest vineyards Whitlands was planted initially with several varieties and extensive experimental vines to determine the impact of soil and climate on ripening and flavour development. The outstanding fruit has been Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay for sparkling wine base. While small parcels of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, are left to ripen fully for table wine, these form only small parcels and only reach their full potential in warmer years. Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc also excel in this slow ripening environment, developing complex lifted aromas and flavour. Future developments are expected to reflect the success of sparkling wine and the cool climate, aromatic varieties.

Brown Brothers Milawa Vineyard
The traditional original vineyard has historically grown an extensive range of varieties, but with the development of the King Valley, the emphasis has been on the success factors of the vineyard - Riesling for our luscious dessert wine, Noble Riesling and Mondeuse for our Shiraz Mondeuse and Cabernet. Dolcetto covers the entire King Park Vineyard (4.85ha) with another 8.28ha at Milawa. Graciano plantings have also been increased with approximately 12.2ha now in the ground. The Hurdle Creek Vineyard which had 6ha of Riesling for Noble Riesling has been expanded with a further 18.3ha.

Brown Brothers Banksdale Vineyard
An ambitious new vineyard of 143 hectares, begun in 1995. The site has been carefully chosen for these varieties, being midway between the coolness of Whitlands and the warmer valley floor. The desire is to achieve highly structured, flavoursome fruit, which will add depth and complexity to existing fruit sources from contracted growers in the adjacent valleys.

Brown Brothers Mystic Park Vineyard
In the Sun drenched Murray Valley, the Company's warmest growing site that has become crucial in the development of generous flavoured fruit such as Tarrango, Orange Muscat, Flora, Dolcetto and Crouchen. These varieties thrive in this environment and regularly produce good crops of excellent fruit. The vineyard also grows excellent crops of Shiraz for table wine, Grenache for Port production with Colombard and Shiraz regularly contributing to the consistency of our softpack wine.

Unlike many wineries,
the history of Starvedog Lane isn’t linked to some long dead legendary winemaker who was the son of someone rich or famous
There are no tales of bravery and courage, and no triumph of the pioneering human spirit. Of suffering and loss, but ultimate victory in the face of adversity all in the interest of bringing you a great drop of wine. Nope. Just a name that comes from some old story about a hungry dog and some German settlers and a bunch of winemakers who are pretty fanatical about what they do. So what Starvedog Lane lack in a colourful and eventful history, they more than make up for with some sensational wines. And at the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about, right?
 Starvedog Lane

As winemakers, it goes without saying grapes are pretty important. Starvedog Lane's come from a little place called the Adelaide Hills region. It’s called that because it’s near Adelaide. And there are plenty of hills. So while it’s not the most imaginatively named region, it has become highly regarded as one of Australia’s best cool climate grape growing regions.

The region itself stretches from Clarendon to McLaren Vale, up to Eden Valley and the start of the Barossa district so there’s a fair bit of it. More than enough, in fact, to give all the wonderful grapes needed to make equally wonderful wines. Some people get a bit nervous when you use a phrase like ‘fresh cut grass’ to describe the flavour of a wine. Unless you’re a cow, terms like this are hardly likely to get your tail wagging. But honestly, don’t let it put you off or else you’ll be missing out on a real treat. If you’ve got something to celebrate, Starvedog Lane is the puppy to do it with. If you haven’t got anything to celebrate, don’t worry, when you’ve got one of these handy you can always celebrate having a damn fine wine to drink.

Starvedog Lane uses many grape types, but it’s certainly no mongrel – quite the opposite in fact. It’s the combination of styles that gives Starvedog Lane it's characteristics, but plenty of the kind of flavour that makes a wine really good. Starvedog Lane goes sensationally well with anything, as aperitifs, with seafood, pasta dishes and the word ‘darling’.

Chardonnay is what many people refer to as The King of white grapes and is one of the most popular white wines going around. If you want a white, and you’re not sure what to get, this is a pretty good way to go. Keep in mind it’s no lightweight though – as far as white go, it’s got more body than most. Unlike their No Oak Chardonnay this one’s gotten rather friendly with French oak so has that classic hint of spicy oak in it. It’s a fine wine with real character, and if you’re thinking of tucking into something like antipasto, scallops, creamy pasta, chicken or even a Thai laksa, this drop is definitely one to savour along with your meal.

Starvedog Lane also makes unwooded wine with the same style of grapes as their regular Chardonnay, but this one’s steered clear of the French connection. While it’s never snuggled up to any French oak, it’s in great company if there’s fish and chips or creamy pasta on the menu. It’s a little lighter than traditional Chardonnay and has plenty of spicy, fruity, flavour without being at all sweet. Paul, the winemaker behind this one, uses words like ‘zest’ and ‘racy’ when he talks about it and says it’s particularly good sitting on ice – we can only imagine he means the wine, not you.

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services